NEO-FEUDALISM 101

“Republicans are very willing to fund things that work in education,” the Mississippi neo-Feudalists say.  And “[we] are unwilling to put money into a formula that has not proven to be effective and that appears to increase the administrative expenditures more than the classroom, they continue.  And how do we know that adequately funding public education doesn’t work in Mississippi? “It [The Mississippi Adequate Education Program] has been fully funded only twice since being put into law in 1997.”

How do you make certain that the underclass remains entrenched and grows and the wealth disparities are hermetically sealed within your society?  Simply, underfund public education or use a divide-and-conquer strategy known as Charter SchoolsNeo-Feudalists (conservatives) never believed in integrated public education,* voting rights, or Civil Rights, these things are anathema to the old hierarchy.  To these practitioners of the old-time religion, government is the problem for which sabotage is a suitable remedy, like putting Michael Brown over FEMA or Clarence Pendleton over the Civil Rights Commission.  And now we smell of a new anti-democratic weapon masquerading as a gift to the people, a competing public education initiative.  Oh, that the Progressives were as proactive as the Regressives are reactive, we could at long last take one step forward without taking two steps backwards in Mississippi. 

 

*”In the Hollow Hope, Gerald Rosenberg points out that between 1961 and 1970, there was a 242 percent increase in the number of non-sectarian private schools in the Southeast. Theses academies were particularly prevalent in the Deep South, but they existed all over the country. The private academies throughout the South have more in common than racial makeup and founding purpose. Many of them have school mascots that reference the Civil War: the Rebels, the Generals, and the Colonels. These academies operated outside the scope of the Brown ruling. Since the ruling did not apply to them, the creation of these academies was a way to keep segregation intact.  Today, of course, almost no American would openly embrace what was once the reigning ethos of segregated schools. Unfortunately, though, everyday thousands of children in America are educated in classrooms that are just as racially homogeneous as classrooms were prior to Brown.”

- “Brown 60 Years Later: Segregation Academies in the Deep South” by Regina Moorer 

The Village – The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc.’s official blog

Comments are closed.