Why the outrage over a statue

The headline read “

FBI to determine if Meredith statue’s defiling is hate crime

 

And you quickly come to realize what Mississippi is and why it is the way it is.  From someone at one of Mississippi’s Seg academies came the following comment:

“ How convenient we forget that Meredith is responsible for the deaths of two innocent victims. He only attended ole miss for one year. He was a paid mule by the naacp.. He himself dislikes the statue and would like to see it removed.” –  · Rusty Reeves · Brandon Academy

Here the commenter’s view is that the man the statue honors was a trouble-maker.  The outrage over the statue’s desecration (the statue’s outrageous treatment, it’s disrespectful treatment) is not understandable to segregationists.  The outrage is not justified, it is not even comprehensible to those who love segregation and things like the supremacist-created Mississippi state flag, (apparently akin the old Georgia (Confederacy-memorializing) state flag which was draped with a noose on the statue) because many white Mississippians have never believed in integration.  And Meredith is a symbol of that which they abhor and find repulsive.  Meredith’s significance is so little appreciated among the majority of Mississippians that you are likely to have agreement with this statement from another of the commenters on the story:

“it sounds like littering laws were the only ones violated.” –  · Noel Funchess  Mississippi State University

The chilling effect such an action as the statue desecration can have on minorities is not unlike a cross burning, as anyone could see the implications of a noose and a confederate symbol draped on a black man’s statue.  Oddly, you would think that Mississippians, black and white, would be particularly sensitive to such an outrage as would all southerners.  You would think that the actions where as alarming to people who know Mississippi’s history as someone yelling fire in a crowded theater, there is a bit of terror evoked.  The people at Ole Miss know this which is why they have made moves avoid prompts to yell “the South will rise again” at football games.  What south is it that people want to see rise again.  And when people pretend not to know the significance of offensive gestures and threatening racial symbols then you know what its like to be in Mississippi. 

 

And for those who say like another of the commenters that

“Yep, you read it correctly – a hate crime against a statue. The word you used – “ridiculous” – isn’t strong enough to describe the absurdity of this. The act of vandalism itself was stupid and the vandals should be punished, but the degree to which it already has been overblown is crazy. I’m running out of adjectives. We haven’t begun to see or hear the end of this.” –  Mike Jones  The University of Alabama

I know clarity isn’t something in which they’re interested. 

And people who don’t see the outrage in the statue desecration probably wouldn’t that think burning a cross would be a hate crime or leaving a swastika on a synagogue door.

However,

“A hate crime is a traditional offense like murder, arson, or vandalism with an added element of bias. For the purposes of collecting statistics, Congress has defined a hate crime as a “criminal offense against a person or property motivated in whole or in part by an offender’s bias against a race, religion, disability, ethnic origin or sexual orientation.”

Now I guess that’s just another reason for some people to hate government and regulation.  It’s funny how some people count the freedom to intimidate others as one of their cherished freedoms.  And you can understand why when you realize that with that freedom they can chase people from the field of play, out of whole areas of activity, and enhance and ensure unchallenged domination.  This is the connection between segregation and supremacy. 

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