Tag Archives: Grand Gulf

Mississippi Energy Institute to pitch nuclear waste storage | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Funny how people like Mississippi Energy Institute President, Patrick Sullivan, when touting the safety record of nuclear plants never mentions that “

  • The Chernobyl accident in 1986 was the result of a flawed reactor design that was operated with inadequately trained personnel.
  • The resulting steam explosion and fires released at least 5% of the radioactive reactor core into the atmosphere and downwind – some 5200 PBq (I-131 eq).
  • Two Chernobyl plant workers died on the night of the accident, and a further 28 people died within a few weeks as a result of acute radiation poisoning.
  • UNSCEAR says that apart from increased thyroid cancers
  • “there is no evidence of a major public health impact attributable to radiation exposure 20 years after the accident.”

      He’ll tell you that “the industry has the best safety record of any in the U.S.” But he won’t mention that “the period of time waste must be stored can range up to millions of years for spent nuclear fuel.”  So does the 34 years since Three-Mile Island really mean anything?

          When Mr. Sullivan, who probably stands to gain handsomely from any nuclear storage in Mississippi speaks of the jobs to be gained by Mississippi from like “100 jobs” and “highway and transportation upgrades he attempts to downplay Mississippi’s transformation into the country’s eternal carcinogenic cesspool. 

          “ A long-deferred cleanup is now under way at 114 of the nation’s nuclear facilities, which encompass an acreage equivalent to Rhode Island and Delaware combined. Many smaller sites, the easy ones, have been cleansed, but the big challenges remain. What’s to be done with 52,000 tons (47,174 metric tons) of dangerously radioactive spent fuel from commercial and defense nuclear reactors? With 91 million gallons (344.5 million liters) of high-level waste left over from plutonium processing, scores of tons of plutonium, more than half a million tons (453,592 metric tons) of depleted uranium, millions of cubic feet of contaminated tools, metal scraps, clothing, oils, solvents, and other waste? And with some 265 million tons (240 million metric tons) of tailings from milling uranium ore—less than half stabilized—littering landscapes?”

          Of course the thing that really makes the plan to turn Mississippi into a radioactive repository viable, the ability that makes nuclear plants viable economic concerns, is something the average Mississippian can’t do if they own a car, the ability to operate insurance.  If the supposed free-market champions were really against government assistance they would be out front encouraging the Tea-baggers to repeal “The Price-Anderson Nuclear Industries Indemnity Act.”  “The Act establishes a no fault insurance-type system in which the first approximately $12.6 billion (as of 2011) is industry-funded as described in the Act. Any claims above the $12.6 billion would be covered by a Congressional mandate to retroactively increase nuclear utility liability or would be covered by the federal government. At the time of the Act’s passing, it was considered necessary as an incentive for the private production of nuclear power — this was because electric utilities viewed the available liability coverage (only $60 million) as inadequate.

          So much for smaller government.  Bet you won’t see Grover Norquist in Mississippi campaigning against the Mississippi Energy Institute nor Heritage or Cato opposing them the way they opposed the Mississippi Insurance Commissioner’s efforts to set up an insurance exchange.  They only want smaller government for the working class, while their sponsors lobby for all types of advantages.   

          Mississippi Energy Institute to pitch nuclear waste storage | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com