Tag Archives: Japanese

Bryant orders 10 HMA hospitals back into Blue Cross network | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

I cannot sit back and allow Mississippians’ access to care to be threatened in violation of state law

What business does any public official have in trying to make certain that citizens have access to medical care? How can a business be compelled to provide a “product in a marketplace at the insistence” of government?
And don’t you remember how, in an effort to support the efficacy of markets in meeting the needs of Americans, RepubliCons said that:

“[t]here is no one who doesn’t have health care in America. No one. Now, they may end up going to the emergency room?”

So what’s all the fuss about insurance companies deciding not to do business with some hospitals because they “charge too much?” Isn’t this just the marketplace at work? Shouldn’t insurance companies be allowed to seek profit like all good capitalists? What’s with the dictatorial intervention? Weren’t the Teabaggers carrying signs of President Obama with Hitler mustaches drawn on his face because of his market interventions? What’s with the government intrusion embodied in the Mississippi Patient Protection Act of 1995?” What’s with the government telling businesses what they must provide? This situation makes a point emphatically. Specifically, the issue is that capitalism is a system devised by man and subject to modifications and variations necessary to serve the people. This democratic Republic, America, is served by capitalism. The Republic is not the servant of capitalism. This is a fact that the conservatives, indoctrinated within the last thirty years, must learn. The more sophisticated conservatives know this which is why they spend so much time lobbying to make laws (modifications and variations) which concentrate capital in relatively few hands while pretending that capitalism just happens to naturally support the trade deficits enhanced by this “service economy” that they have convinced the public is most desirable for America. This salesmanship of substandard economic conditions explains why many Americans’ desired to keep the insurance plans that they had before enactment of the Affordable Care Act, a situation that could be compared to domestic abuse. The form of capitalism practiced in this country is designed and modified by men; it is not some natural, organic formation sent to us by God. If our form of capitalism is so superior then why do we find ourselves begging other countries with much more socialism (government mandated health care) in their economies for jobs?

It is ironic how conservative governors from southern states who complain about government thwarting private markets and competition spend time and state resources pursuing Japanese investment in their states when according to author T.R. Reid in “The Healing of America, “[d]espite universal coverage and prodigious consumption, Japan spends a lot less for health care that most of the developed nations; with costs running at about 8 percent of GDP, it spends about half as much as the United States.” And get this Teabaggers, the Japanese require everyone to sign up. They call it a personal mandate. The irony is that so called conservatives are attacking personal responsibility and seeking investment from people (foreign capitalists?) who make certain that all of their citizens have health care while complaining about a “’woodwork effect,’ an allusion to people [American citizens] who currently quality for Medicaid but are not covered and will ‘come out of the woodwork’ to qualify because of new changes affecting people without insurance.” Just think about that for a moment. Here you have Americans alluded to as bugs, as insects who will come out of the “woodwork” to get what, crumbs? Actually CONservatives, [see Mitt Romney and Steel Dynamics] are very skilled at getting government to assist them while pretending that the resources that they get, they got all by themselves when they have really benefited for jobs programs, activities subsidized in one fashion or another by a government of the people. Their brilliance is in their ability to convince their constituents that they don’t need the government while channeling government to assist their constituents. You even have a private entity Blue Cross/Blue Shield complaining about constituent services: complaining that “the hospital management company [with whom the big insurer has a dispute] and its lobbyists have donated thousands of dollars in “political contributions” to the governor.”

The health care conversation is Mississippi doesn’t just smell of classism, it reeks of elitism. The political establishment is fighting to maintain health care access for one group of Mississippians while being willing to in the words of a local reporter who’s been covering the Mississippi health care struggle for the Clarion Ledger in Jackson, Ms., Sam R. Hall , to ignore “the loss of DSH payments” which “would equal nearly $1.4 billion” [these are federal funds paid to the state to help cover indigent care in hospitals which are scheduled to go away] and not expand Medicaid. In the words of Mr. Hall

“[t]hat’s $400 million more than if every single eligible Mississippian allowed joined after expanding the Medicaid program, and we know that’s 100 percent will never join.”

Pew!!!! We can’t just be imagining that smell. The state of Mississippi while begging for jobs from a country with universal health care continues to refuse to assist Mississippians making more than $5,500 per year, the Medical cutoff, get health care while compelling a private insurer to provide health care access for Mississippians making considerable more than $5,500, Mississippians making enough to afford a BCBS policy.

Remarkable still is the protestations about big government involvement in Mississippi and assertions of state’s rights (in the antebellum southern spirit) even to the point where Senator Thad Cochran will now face a Teabagger opponent even as a “proportion of federal spending in Mississippi is directed toward large federal installations such as Camp Shelby, John C. Stennis Space Center, Meridian Naval Air Station, Columbus Air Force Base, and Keesler Air Force Base.” And there are also the private sector extensions of the military industrial complex like Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi.
To ignore Tip O’Neill’s maxim, “all politics is local,” is to abandon the field to the Teabaggers who are the servants, wittingly or unwittingly, of the neo-feudalists who are ordering society in a fashion that produces less social mobility. And access to health care, if you look at the rest of the industrialized world, is critical to that dream as it provides the foundation for productivity so that “you can build that,” that being whatever your dream is.

Bryant orders 10 HMA hospitals back into Blue Cross network | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Yokohama Y’all!!!, Big government Japanese expose hypocracy of small government Mississippians

Thank God for the Buddhist or whatever those Japanese are who are bringing (with government aid) the Yokohama Tire plant to Clay County, Mississippi with its 18% unemployment rate?  Sorry, Morris (Morris Thigpen, the head of the local Heritage Foundation clone, the Mississippi Center for Public Policy) that you guys didn’t get a chance to plan a Cato-attack a la the recent Mississippi Insurance Exchange assault or animate supposed “big-government” opposition similar to the anti-economic-growth-medical-infrastructure-strangling Medicaid-expansion opposition.  There are never any estimates of the number of jobs we’ll create by not expanding Medicaid or by not wooing the Japanese to build here with that (you-didn’t-build-that-alone) government assistance. Surely not expanding Medicaid will be as economically beneficial as not implementing Medicaid or Medicare would have been.  And just think how many more jobs we would have had in the south if the government hadn’t created the TVA, and there would not have been a “TVA official”* to “quickly summon” to answer “Japanese execs” questions about power for Yokohama.  Now if we can just allow some Buddhists, exercising Mississippi’s new religious freedom law, to pray at school assemblies and football games we can get really get things going economically.

*

*Clarion Ledger “Landing Clay County tire plant was no easy task” Apr. 27, 2013

 

If the Japanese execs had a question about power, for example, a TVA official was quickly summoned”

What is clarity to the blind?

Sid Salter, columnist for a Mississippi paper, is right when he says “Worker benefits of unionizing Nissan Plant (Mississippi) remain unclear, especially to an anti-labor columnist. Of course anti-labor people with neo-feudal sympathies in a place where wages have routinely trailed the country wouldn’t, to quote a piece I wrote to the local paper, “remind the public of the benefits of labor solidarity (Labor Day, child labor laws, minimum wage, and workman compensation statues). No, that’s the unfilled role of comatose organized Labor in the U.S. This negligence allows Conservatives to easily substitute “taxpayers” for “workers” as misdirection in dialogue about fairness. The conversation is consequently principally about taxation as opposed to trade and good-paying jobs with benefits, which reduce government dependence. So when someone who discounts American labor’s contributions to the country’s general welfare celebrates the decline of unions and doesn’t mention the simultaneous wage stagnation and disappearance of defined benefit plans in this country, the average American doesn’t comprehend the implicit devaluation of the American worker. The Labor movements loud silence is the starting gun in this, American labor’s sprint down the real road to serfdom.”
The presence of unions didn’t destroy the Detroit auto-industry any more than they are destroying the German economy. For clarity Mr. Salter some of the issues at the Nissan plant” ”

Isiac Jackson, Chairman of Mississippians for Fairness at Nissan, says the plant may employ 5 thousand people, but many of those are temporary employees, paid well less than the average Nissan rate.

Jackson says, “Why can’t you hire the person and pay them the right salary? Does that make sense? Why is it that you (Nissan) can give all this money to an agency that pays half the price to the worker?”

“And no matter how hard he tries Mr. Salter will not be able to satisfactorily justify a defense of his position that American workers somehow don’t deserve something South African and Japanese workers have, unions. Contrary to Mr. Salter’s anti-labor contention, what is really spurring Japanese auto plants construction in the U.S., actually providing the foundation for their existence is not Mississippi’s Right-to-work-for-less law but American trade policy and state race-to-the-bottom-give-aways. While Mr. Salter talks about how unconvincing Danny Glover is as a union advocate, the southern media’s role in applauding and defending foreign owned auto plants for providing wages that “are not out of line with other non-union auto manufacturing plants in the region” has been very convincing in their depiction of labor as destroyer of Detroit auto dominance with ne’er a mention of heatlth care costs or managerial decisions. Clearly such a depiction reveals much of the southern anti-labor commentary to be little more than public relations work for foreign auto corporations. Of course if you are basically a Toyota or Nissan propagandist your blindness in this regard is expected.