Tag Archives: Koch brothers

Sebelius deflects criticism on ObamaCare-tied cancellation notices | Fox News

To the American people

“You deserve better. I apologize. I’m accountable to you for fixing these problems”

Those were the remorseful words from our President for not finding weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, right?

No, I don’t remember the President saying that. No, forgive me. Those were the words of Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius about computer glitches that have frustrated many Americans as they show their interest in affordable healthcare. What if, in this instance, in responding to the opponents of healthcare reform, the progressive part of the country did as Mitt Romney suggested in the title to his book and remembered No Apology is necessary when you’re doing the right thing. Conservatives held to this principle and didn’t apologize, even when what they did was the wrong thing like suggesting that Saddam and Bin Laden were somehow aligned and Saddam had WMD that he could give to terrorists. Not only didn’t the Bush administration apologize for misleading the country into an unnecessary war, none of the RepubliCons, who have attempted to block implementation of Obamacare at every turn and now are complaining that Americans don’t have access to the very thing to which they don’t want them to have access, none of these Crypto-fascists demanded any resignations related to the great, as Thomas Ricks described it, Fiasco, the Iraq War.

What, however, is ingenious is the RepubliCons’ ability to make a charge, as in the case of Shirley Sherrod, or a demand, like the individual mandate, and watch liberals, apparently acting out of some self-imagined superiority, go into overdrive to prove how compromising and pure, they are by forcing resignations or implementing proposals. Sometimes a little Bush-Cheney cowboy attitude may be good. It seems to be the only thing Teabaggers can recognize as American. Perhaps Liberals should meet them, the conservative, Teabagger fringe, half-way and speak a little of their lingo say to the RepubliCons: Sebelius ain’t going nowhere and we’re going to mend not end it, the Affordable Care Act.

And when you hear things like

“Some people like to drive a Ford, not a Ferrari,” Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., said. “You’re taking away their choice.” 

Perhaps you should respond: Yes, Rep. Marsha “Michelle-Bachman-southern-edition” Blackburn, some people may like to drive vehicles that are “Unsafe at any speed” but that doesn’t mean that the government should encourage their production or use by giving anti-trust protection to their manufacturers.

Tell those Cyrpto-Fascists who’ve done everything within their power to protect the insurance equivalent of slum lords that America, via the Affordable Care Act, is getting rid of all that condemned property, junk insurance; we’re moving our people away from pre-existing condition barriers and lifetime caps and doughnut holes. And we need to remove the health insurance anti-trust exemption.

In the process of calling for Secretary Sebelius’ resignation comes “It’s throwing good money after bad. It’s time for her to resign — someone else to take charge,” from Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., top Republican on the Senate health panel. Funny, but I never heard him or the other Crypto-Fascists call for resignation after the American people were told that the Iraq war would pay for itself or that we would be greeted as liberators or the Iraq or Afghanistan wars weren’t included in the budget by these all-of-sudden-concerned-with-the-debt-no-bid-contract-giving Crypto-Fascists. Similarly there was no hue and cry when members of his party orchestrated a government shutdown that costs $24 billion in GDP. No, keeping Teabaggers in office is not, in Senator Alexander’s words, “throwing good money after bad.”

Yes, Secretary Sebelius, Americans do deserve better. So, please stay on the job. The Mississippi Yokohama employees deserve healthcare access as good as the Yokohama employees in Japan and the Affordable Care Act is a move in that direction with true out-in-the-open standards. Yes I said Japan, that country where southern governors go to get jobs for their citizens. Japan, where the average Japanese visits a doctor about 14.5 times per year-three times as often as the U.S. average, there is universal coverage, and they spend about 8% of GDP on healthcare, about half as much as the United States and they have a personal mandate with heavy government(Ministry of Health and Welfare) involvement in pricing.* Fortunately, we are taking steps to bend the costs curve because our government is no longer asleep at the wheel. Fortunately we are not yielding to those who did nothing when they had the chance, when they controlled both houses of congress and the presidency to reform healthcare in America. So, no, Dr. Ben “maybe-I-am-the-one-who-needs-brain-surgery” Carson, we are not going to some health savings account where someone can run out of money in the middle of treatment, you neo-feudalist-Heritage-Fund-Koch-Brother-flunky you who calls Obamacare which forces standards on insurance companies,slavery.

The crying over the cancellation of junk plans is reminiscent of domestic abuse cases. If a spouse is deserted by an abuser (like insurance companies changing substandard plans that could have been grandfathered and sending cancellation notices to customers) sometimes the spouse may not realize that that desertion probably just saved their life.

* “The Healing of America” by T.R. Reid.

Sebelius deflects criticism on ObamaCare-tied cancellation notices | Fox News

Mississippi Energy Institute to pitch nuclear waste storage | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Funny how people like Mississippi Energy Institute President, Patrick Sullivan, when touting the safety record of nuclear plants never mentions that “

  • The Chernobyl accident in 1986 was the result of a flawed reactor design that was operated with inadequately trained personnel.
  • The resulting steam explosion and fires released at least 5% of the radioactive reactor core into the atmosphere and downwind – some 5200 PBq (I-131 eq).
  • Two Chernobyl plant workers died on the night of the accident, and a further 28 people died within a few weeks as a result of acute radiation poisoning.
  • UNSCEAR says that apart from increased thyroid cancers
  • “there is no evidence of a major public health impact attributable to radiation exposure 20 years after the accident.”

      He’ll tell you that “the industry has the best safety record of any in the U.S.” But he won’t mention that “the period of time waste must be stored can range up to millions of years for spent nuclear fuel.”  So does the 34 years since Three-Mile Island really mean anything?

          When Mr. Sullivan, who probably stands to gain handsomely from any nuclear storage in Mississippi speaks of the jobs to be gained by Mississippi from like “100 jobs” and “highway and transportation upgrades he attempts to downplay Mississippi’s transformation into the country’s eternal carcinogenic cesspool. 

          “ A long-deferred cleanup is now under way at 114 of the nation’s nuclear facilities, which encompass an acreage equivalent to Rhode Island and Delaware combined. Many smaller sites, the easy ones, have been cleansed, but the big challenges remain. What’s to be done with 52,000 tons (47,174 metric tons) of dangerously radioactive spent fuel from commercial and defense nuclear reactors? With 91 million gallons (344.5 million liters) of high-level waste left over from plutonium processing, scores of tons of plutonium, more than half a million tons (453,592 metric tons) of depleted uranium, millions of cubic feet of contaminated tools, metal scraps, clothing, oils, solvents, and other waste? And with some 265 million tons (240 million metric tons) of tailings from milling uranium ore—less than half stabilized—littering landscapes?”

          Of course the thing that really makes the plan to turn Mississippi into a radioactive repository viable, the ability that makes nuclear plants viable economic concerns, is something the average Mississippian can’t do if they own a car, the ability to operate insurance.  If the supposed free-market champions were really against government assistance they would be out front encouraging the Tea-baggers to repeal “The Price-Anderson Nuclear Industries Indemnity Act.”  “The Act establishes a no fault insurance-type system in which the first approximately $12.6 billion (as of 2011) is industry-funded as described in the Act. Any claims above the $12.6 billion would be covered by a Congressional mandate to retroactively increase nuclear utility liability or would be covered by the federal government. At the time of the Act’s passing, it was considered necessary as an incentive for the private production of nuclear power — this was because electric utilities viewed the available liability coverage (only $60 million) as inadequate.

          So much for smaller government.  Bet you won’t see Grover Norquist in Mississippi campaigning against the Mississippi Energy Institute nor Heritage or Cato opposing them the way they opposed the Mississippi Insurance Commissioner’s efforts to set up an insurance exchange.  They only want smaller government for the working class, while their sponsors lobby for all types of advantages.   

          Mississippi Energy Institute to pitch nuclear waste storage | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

          Nothing eery about voter ID | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

          Nothing eery about voter ID | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com.

          All of a sudden I saw it. It had reappeared on the internet, a defense of Mississippi’s photo ID law from a reader in Alabama. It was time to take another one down and perform an autopsy.

          Inside the guts of “Nothing eery about voter ID”

          Nothing eery about voter ID