Tag Archives: Mississippi

Mississippi reminds me of Candyland

You know Candyland, that plantation in Tarantino’s movie Django Unchained, a racist domain where house Negroes get special treatment and privileges. Sometimes Mississippi reminds me of Candyland because it’s a place where privileged blacks are the willing accomplices of people with white supremacist’s goals, attacking the aspirations of hard working black people and degrade black upward mobility. A bill to make a government department into a plantation where the overseer determines who has a job and who does not have a job was recently introduced by a black Senator. Sometimes, like Stephen in the movie Django Unchained, blacks, in the service of a dominant white power structure, willingly aid in the mistreatment of other blacks. The bill is Senate Bill 2804 and the role of Stephen was played by Senator Sampson Jackson II. The bill removes civil service protections from all the employees of a department of Mississippi’s state government, the Department of Correction, recently brought Stephen, a character from Django Unchained to mind. Stephen, a slave, had a problem with a person, Django, who appeared to be, like him, assigned to a lower station in society because of his race who yet seemed to be above him or more esteemed than him; Django appeared to be free. Perhaps it was some sense of envy that caused Senator Sampson Jackson II to author a bill to remove the equal protection from so many people with whom he shared a racial history. Maybe it was something else, some hidden emolument some future appointment. Who knows? But you have to wonder why a black legislator, knowing Mississippi’s history of discrimination against blacks, knowing the level playing field that Mississippi’s State Personnel Board provides, would offer a bill to tilt the field, to place so many of the people whose ancestors were systematically deprived into a position where they too can be systematically deprived of their livelihood. In the movie, Stephen tells Django that there will always be a Candyland. Looking at Mississippi and people like Senator Sampson Jackson and Representative Angela Cockerham, Stephen seems to be right.

You can view the bill which was passed here.
SB2804PS(STATE PERSONNEL BOARD)(2)
This is a profile on Stephen, I mean Senator Sampson Jackson II.
Sampson Jackson II
This is a profile of Representative Angela Cockerham who also participated in the destruction of fair employment practices.
Angela Cockerham

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This is the part where the street performer passes the hat or cup.
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Governor, that ain’t rain

Do you feel that warm, wet substance on your leg? You got to feel it when someone suggests the state of public education in Mississippi is so fine that funding to equalize schools should only be increased by 2.7 per cent and taxes should be cut.

Is Mississippi 19th in Education?

19th in education,1 that’s what you were supposed to think about Mississippi’s education position, nationally, according to the conservatives (Governor’s State of the State Address 2015). But the number refers to spending as a percentage of “state taxable resources.” Misdirection is the conservatives’ forte. Speaking of spending as a percentage of “state taxable resources.” diverts attention from equality, the lack of adequately funding all school districts, an underfunding which in turn affects the need for college remedial efforts (in neo-feudal Mississippi college remediation has come under attack – read Bricks without straw) and workforce re-training (costlier to re-train workers with learning deficiencies), new business formation (“highly educated areas have above average entrepreneurship rates”)2etc. A state can’t deprive the people of equal education funding and not suffer the consequences in retarded economic growth and human potential, this exhibited in increased crime rates.3

A state can’t deprive its citizens and avoid these consequences, but groups within the state can deprive large segments of equal educational opportunities, profiting disproportionately in a way that shifts wealth upward. But what do you expect from a crowd determined to urinate on your leg and tell you it’s raining. A crowd so disingenuous that they crow about how well Mississippi’s economy’s is doing and never thank Uncle Sugar(see Mike Huckabee government assistance reference) No, they’ll never mention the $97 million in recovery funds to Rankin County, Ms. and the $67 million to Madison County, Ms., or that Mississippi’s economy received over $5 billion in stimulus funding. Despite the evidence, conservatives insist that the ARRA didn’t create any jobs. So when it comes to everything from public education to ObamaCare, who you gonna believe the neo-feudalists and their walking dead sycophants or your lying eyes and those darn numbers? But then again maybe the conservatives are right and what their trickle-down proposals work and the thousands of jobs we were losing when Obama came into office is the way things should be; maybe rain is warm and smells like pee.

1 Gov. Bryant’s full 2015 State of the State speech – Clarion Ledger
January 21, 2015
2 Local labor force education, new business characteristics, and firm performance
Mark Doms a,*, Ethan Lewis b, Alicia Robb c
a Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, United States
b Dartmouth College, United States
c Kauffman Foundation and University of California, Santa Cruz, United States

3. The Effect of Education on Crime: Evidence from Prison Inmates,
Arrests, and Self-Reports
Lance Lochner
Department of Economics
University of Western Ontario
Enrico Moretti
Department of Economics
UCLA

Biblical backing for current government policy?

Eureka!!! Eureka, “unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be less required” Of course this “conservative” interpretation of the good book, substituting less for more, the very book that some conservatives want to make the state book, is why we have American laws which allow wealthier Americans to stash money in the Cayman’s and Switzerland. It is the reason social security taxes still max out at $118,000, leaving those under that amount paying the tax on a greater share of their earnings than millionaires and billionaires and those making hundreds of thousands of dollars; less must be required. The “conservative” biblical interpretations are the reason the state of Mississippi turns it back on Medicaid expansion, “as you have done it unto the least of these you have done it unto the undeserving worldly.” In the “conservative mind,” Genesis should be interpreted literally, but the Gospels are, like beauty is, in the eye of the beholder. After all, who would give their son for the world’s salvation, like some bleeding heart liberal? Clearly an unadulterated socialist.

Maybe Mississippi’s last place position is profitable.

Maybe directing attention towards making the bible the official state book and placing “in God we trust” on the State Seal, are expressions of self-righteousness, comforting on the one hand to those who rely heavily on symbols but the actions are diversionary on the whole. Those who direct the government in this manner take on the persona of holy men directing public policy. Political priesthood bona fides established, “conservative” leaders who undermine acceptance of federal assistance to expand Medicaid or erect new voting requirements are less likely to have their judgment challenged. After all, how can holy men mislead the religious? The “conservative” leaders, as opposed to Mississippi’s poor and middle class, have an economic interest in the status quo, a crypto-neo-feudalistic system, profiting as a result of their positions. The wolves clothed as sheep are so comfortable in their disguise that they snarl those who oppose them “can get off their butts and move somewhere else.” And those comforted by the religious gestures roar approvingly, content with a vicarious moral superiority, their reverence for symbolic gestures distracting them, facilitating the shackles of last place.

The inspiration for this post was a very informative piece in the Clarion Ledger, “Why are Mississippians conservative?” by Robert S. McElvaine, Elizabeth Chisholm Professor of Arts and Letters and chair of the Department of History at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi.

You’d think Bible-belt Mississippi would know its Genesis.

Mississippi’s gotta-have-it-now attitude is kinda like Esau’s in the book of Genesis, willing to trade the future for immediate gratification. For those of you who might have forgotten the story, Esau comes in starving from a hunt and decides that he wants to have some of the stew that his brother, Jacob, is cooking. He then proceeds to trade his birthright for a meal. Those taxes that the Mississippi Republicans are talking about cutting could be used for public education. But no, some anti-public-education-conservatives are determined to make certain that the public trades the investment in tomorrow for tax-refunds, cruelly using wage poor Mississippians to strengthen the state’s wealth disparity. Looking at things like the GI bill we know how much a society gains from giving itself education and should adequately fund public education.

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest,” Ben Franklin said.

Now would be a good time to take Franklin’s advice and resist the temptation to which Esau succumbed.

NEO-FEUDALISM 101

“Republicans are very willing to fund things that work in education,” the Mississippi neo-Feudalists say.  And “[we] are unwilling to put money into a formula that has not proven to be effective and that appears to increase the administrative expenditures more than the classroom, they continue.  And how do we know that adequately funding public education doesn’t work in Mississippi? “It [The Mississippi Adequate Education Program] has been fully funded only twice since being put into law in 1997.”

How do you make certain that the underclass remains entrenched and grows and the wealth disparities are hermetically sealed within your society?  Simply, underfund public education or use a divide-and-conquer strategy known as Charter SchoolsNeo-Feudalists (conservatives) never believed in integrated public education,* voting rights, or Civil Rights, these things are anathema to the old hierarchy.  To these practitioners of the old-time religion, government is the problem for which sabotage is a suitable remedy, like putting Michael Brown over FEMA or Clarence Pendleton over the Civil Rights Commission.  And now we smell of a new anti-democratic weapon masquerading as a gift to the people, a competing public education initiative.  Oh, that the Progressives were as proactive as the Regressives are reactive, we could at long last take one step forward without taking two steps backwards in Mississippi. 

 

*”In the Hollow Hope, Gerald Rosenberg points out that between 1961 and 1970, there was a 242 percent increase in the number of non-sectarian private schools in the Southeast. Theses academies were particularly prevalent in the Deep South, but they existed all over the country. The private academies throughout the South have more in common than racial makeup and founding purpose. Many of them have school mascots that reference the Civil War: the Rebels, the Generals, and the Colonels. These academies operated outside the scope of the Brown ruling. Since the ruling did not apply to them, the creation of these academies was a way to keep segregation intact.  Today, of course, almost no American would openly embrace what was once the reigning ethos of segregated schools. Unfortunately, though, everyday thousands of children in America are educated in classrooms that are just as racially homogeneous as classrooms were prior to Brown.”

- “Brown 60 Years Later: Segregation Academies in the Deep South” by Regina Moorer 

The Village – The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc.’s official blog

Where was he looking? And what does he mean, “we”?

“We found no one was denied the right to vote in Mississippi,” crowed Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann after Mississippi’s photo ID law was used in June 2014. Yet of the 513 people who cast affidavit ballots in June 2014 in Mississippi, 177, jumped through the newly created photo-ID hoop, returning to prove that they were not guilty of attempted voter fraud by presenting a government-approved photo ID. Of the 513, according to the vote Nazi, Hosemann, “13 had their ballots rejected for other reasons, such as not being a registered voter.” So there you have 323 registered voters who were possibly denied the right to vote.

“We are very pleased with the numbers,” he said. “They reflect Mississippi is able to conduct its own elections.”

“We” definitely doesn’t include the people who were registered to vote but couldn’t or didn’t because someone else decided that their previous efforts to participate in this Democratic Republic weren’t sufficient. In the words of a great Civil Rights activist, “Is this America?”

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Hosemann responds to editorial criticizing voter ID lawMississippi Business Journal

 

Hosemann responds to editorial criticizing voter ID lawMississippi Business Journal

What’s most disturbing is the slimy way this southern gentleman tries to slither away from his fellow snakes by talking about how he’s done everything possible to make the theft of voting rights fair.  He’s sought all the permission possible to demonstrate the cleanliness and fairness of  his state’s destruction of voting rights (already registered voters must now show photos of themselves to vote otherwise don’t bother showing up even though you are a citizen who has already registered).  And to top it off he thinks, like the character Bele in an episode of Star Trek, who thought it was obvious that he was superior because he was white on the left side of his body and his enemy was black on the left side of his body, it should be obvious that Mississippi is not like Texas or those other photo ID states.  He actually thinks that simply because there are no suits filed against Mississippi, yet, then what Mississippi has done is fair and honest, that Mississippi is superior. that because of superficial attributes, Mississippi is really substantially different from the other disenfranchisement extremists.

And it suits  Mr. Hosemann’ s ignorance in the service neo-confederate-voter disenfranchisement  to not  address Professor Alan Draper’s reminder: 

Less than 10% of voting age whites in Mississippi do not have a driver’s license while almost 30% of voting age blacks are without one. That is, eligible black voters are three times as likely as whites to lack the most common form of government-issued ID required to vote.” 

 

Mr. Hosemann talks about people who showed up to vote not the pool of eligible voters.  No if he were to be honest, Mr. Hosemann would admit that his efforts are most pernicious to those who aren’t colored right.

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Being hosed by Hosemann


It’s the old smallpox-in-the-blanket routine. This apparently is a comically, disarming sales gimmick meant to cast Mississippi’s neo-confederate voting restrictions as minority-friendly. Mr. Haney, I mean Secretary Hosemann, is still trying to favorably portray an ice-to-the-Eskimos- purchase, $1.5 million and counting to stop non-existent in-person voter fraud. Mr. Haney says that Mississippians can use driver’s licenses that are 10 years old, but that’s not what the neo-confederate devils wrote into the details of the law, smuggled-in law via a Trojan-horse initiative. And how long after Obama is out office do you think it will be before Mr. Haney is demanding strict adherence to the law and the neo-confederates add more birth-certificate-type requirements to obtain the “free” photo ID? Why photo ID? Just look at the lower-voting effect of these type laws on black and young people in Kansas and Tennessee.* For the shrewd confidence man, Mr. Haney, advancing voting constrictions is money in the bank (job security). Beautiful Mr. Haney, disenfranchisement wrapped in a voter-integrity blanket.

Oh, and below is the white version of the commercial that Hosemann ran, the forerunner of the ad he ran coincidently matching Cochran’s black appeal campaign. Funny how the Secretary of State’s office ran a black version of the ad to appeal to the voting segment most negatively impacted by the voting changes, a segment which could prove to be pivotal to Cochran’s re-election, if Tea Partier’s Chris McDaniel’s supporters, Cochran’s primary opponent, staged a protest campaign in the general election. Apparently using a black woman in the ad proves that the law couldn’t possibly be harmful to minorities.

*Study: Voter ID laws cut turnout by blacks, young

Conservatives love to hate the government

 

Chris McDaniel, 2014 Mississippi U.S. Senate candidate, may be the best thing for Mississippi. At long last Mississippi would be able to end its secret lover (Strom Thurmanesque) relationship with the federal government.
McDaniel would back Utah Sen. Mike “Laughing Stock” Lee

Well paid clowns running interference for the insurance companies

the next time Republicans decide to shut the government down (like the Tea Party shutdown/Republican employment plan which idled thousands of Utah workers) as a way of showing how they would be willing to widen the doughnut hole for seniors (a hole which Obamacare closes) for freedom’s sake.
Oh, the government is too large, the constitutional conservatives say, so no one should have a problem with cutting farm subsidies and letting the free market work in Mississippi, right? And, by ending this affair that the people have with their government, Mississippi could help stop the government from forcing insurance companies to allow Mississippians to keep their children on their health policies until they’re 26 or to accept people with pre-existing conditions.
Yes, Republicans are ideal for America because they know that nothing fails like all that government and/or labor involvement in the market. Just look at those wretched Singaporeans, Japanese and Germans with their economies in total free-fall, totally un-American.