Tag Archives: Mississippi

Plunkett: DSH payments will never be cut. Dems should vote to reauthorize Medicaid now. | Mississippi PEP

 

Plunkett: DSH payments will never be cut. Dems should vote to reauthorize Medicaid now. | Mississippi PEP

Republicans keep projecting their wishes on the future, forecasting that the things for which they long are “inevitable.” They say things like “With one single decision President Barack Obama pulled the rug out from under any moves by Mississippi Democrats to expand Medicaid in Mississippi.” And that undoing his “signature achievement as President” was “inevitable.” Now this bit of prognostication was a conservative Mississippian’s response to the Obama administration’s decision several months ago to delay “cuts to DSH payments” (“Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payments are given to hospitals by the federal government to states through Medicaid for caring for the uninsured”).

Conservatives say this because they see a delay in implementing a shift in payment for indigent care (which they have been successful in labeling a penalty for the states) as a fatal flaw, even getting liberals to adopt the “Luntz” framing. And, although many of the people they, the Crpto-Fascists, count as supporters would die without expansion, they, in clear Atwater fashion, seem perfectly content with repealing:

Coverage which

And the pseudo-anti-judicial activists rejoiced in hearing an activist court legislate with under cover of a flimsy explanation like:

“What Congress is not free to do is to penalize States that choose not to participate in that new program by taking away their existing Medicaid funding”

effectively revitalizing the old states-rights ideology almost a century and a half after the Civil War settled the issue and challenging Congress’ authority to determine how indigent care will be compensated. In one of the most striking examples of the effect of poor history education in America, the American public voted for people who are actually states-rights proponents as if they, “the people,” have no idea that this was the position of staunch white supremacists who sought to rend the Union asunder. How is Medicaid a new program? How does the Court tell Congress how to aid the indigent?

It is, indeed, amazing that somehow shifting the funding to compensate providers for indigent care from disproportionate care payments to Medicaid payments can be viewed as a penalty when:

“Congress had amended Medicaid more than 50 times since its enactment, with a trend of enlarging the population and services covered by the program”

And none of these expansions were considered penalties? As I said, the Supreme Court conservatives, who acted as neo-confederates, used a flimsy excuse to indulge in some conservative-orchestrated judicial activism.

Conservatives say that the

Supreme Court of the United States ruled that states had the legal authority to reject expansion and the federal government could do nothing to penalize states for it.” Of course this was the courts response to “all or nothing.”

But there is nothing to stop congress from reducing the payments over time regardless of whether a state expands Medicaid or not Mr. State’s Rights, as in “ignoring states’ decisions to expand Medicaid when calculating the DSH reductions, meaning states won’t face a financial penalty for refusing the Medicaid expansion as the reductions could be made without any regard to whether a state expands Medicaid or not. Wishing that the law will go away and funneling your attacks to a hypocrite-judicial-activist, states-rights Chief Justice (whose states-rights ideology lines up with even Mississippi neo-confederates) doesn’t mean that the American people will get rid of a law which addresses

Costs

And

Care

But back to that wishful thinking about the delay being the unraveling of the Affordable Care Act. The conservative’s argument goes:

“DSH payments were never going to be cut. One only need to look at the SGR and the annual “Doc Fix” under Medicare to see a perfect example of why,”

comparing Medicare advocacy to Medicaid advocacy. This is delusional, as the Medicare constituents are not the same as a substantial number of the Medicaid constituents. In their delusions about ObamaCare and their fixation with repealing it, conservative pundits have conflated the two. Medicaid constituents, by and large, are not appearing at Tea Party rallies, trying, asininely, to wreck the people’s government. Wish as the neo-confederates will, the people targeted in “their home districts for voting against providing health care to the most needy” won’t be the people who are vigorously advocating Medicaid expansion. It won’t be the people who know the 7 things Republicans don’t want their working class constituents to know who will be confused about who’s responsible for service reductions to the needy. The non-Republican Medicaid recipients already know who is trying to cut SNAP and WIC benefits, in short assistance to the most vulnerable. They know that wishing that Republicans would actually favor social programs won’t make it happen; they know that wishing won’t make it so.

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Democrats are Remarkably Lazy

Well, how else can you explain the Republican Party’s success at co-opting things Democrats fought to put in place? I referred to the Democratic Party as the originator of things that RepubliCons pretend to support in another piece (Ruining Government(The Great REpubliConned pastime) where I also posit the notion that the Republican plan is to castigate and undermine the functioning of government at every opportunity, as part of a grand privatization scheme benefiting an oligarchic donor class.
Here is a Mississippi example of this co-opting.

Look at these pictures

Hosemann PR campaign (3) 12PassRoadstudents974

Hosemann PR campaign (2) 04Class2196

These are pictures from Promote the Vote in Mississippi.

This next picture is a picture of the current Mississippi Secretary of State, Republican Delbert Hosemann congratulating a program participant.

hosemann PR campaign IMG_0088
The literature from Secretary Hosemann’s website says

Tightly aligned with the Mississippi Social Studies Framework and developed in cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Education, PTV’s curriculum consists of voter education lesson plans and activities developmentally appropriate and unique to each grade level. Along with the lessons, the PTV Mock Election allows students to experience voting for official statewide candidates in a simulated election prior to the actual General Election.

What’s missing in the “voter education lesson plan” is the part where the students produce a copy of there birth certificate to get an ID to vote, the new RepubliCon wrinkle. The wrinkle is evidence of the difference between the Democratic and Republican parties. The Republican Party having switched characteristics with the Democratic Party, after integration and the influx of blacks into the Democratic Party, is now the party of the “systematic and ingenious discrimination” that the Voting Rights Act was supposed to counter. In Mr. Hosemann, you have a man, co-opting a program, Promote the Vote, begun by a Democrat, Eric Clark, while simultaneously defending voting constrictions wherein people are forced to get birth certificates to vote. Although Hosemann, twisting to sanitize an odorous, offensive law, has come up with some sort of Administrative agreement that contradicts the actual law, restricting access to supposedly “free” IDs means that the IDs are not free and considering the differences in income related to race the law is definitely discriminatory. But perhaps in Mississippi, it doesn’t matter whether Democrats worked harder at not allowing Democratic plans which benefit the common man to be co-opted by Republicans. After all, if your define yourself by allegiance to a symbol of repression, an emblem of class for which race is a proxy, maybe we shall not overcome Lee Atwater’s analysis.

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DROWNING THE GOVERNMENT IN MISSISSIPPI

How do you reduce government to the size that you could “drown it in a bathtub?
Well, let me rephrase the question.
What happens when you underfund government salaries?

But the talent and skill drain is only one dimension of the scheme. The consequence of the talent and skill drain serves the greater purpose of the plan. It drains resources from a key Democratic party constituency, state employees. Simultaneously, it converts those same employees into Republicans because they, with talents and skills hone in state service, can sell their services back to the state through a competing private service, oh say, private prisons or DHS administration. The Republican party of today appeals, through it’s survival-of-the-fittest attraction it John-Wayne-individualism allure, to man’s basest nature. The common good be dawned.

But the most immediate consequence of their underfunding scheme is direct monetary benefits from the wealthy and connected which was actually behind the efforts of Tea Party types to circumvent the State Personnel Board. It’s funny how these “small government” groups (and we know what they really mean

) are really fronts for people who are devising means of CAPTURING THE GOVERNMENT PURSE

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FBI to determine if Meredith statue’s defiling is hate crime | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

 

FBI to determine if Meredith statue’s defiling is hate crime | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

The conversation:

 

Statement:

Stanley Beech · Top Commenter · Blackjack Dealer at Pearl River Resort

First of all, what did the man accomplish in order for a statue to be made in his honor? I don’t recall him becoming famous for anything.Actually it was one of Bobby Kennedy’s pet projects that resulted in two people being killed..If someone is deserving of a statue so be it, but not James Meredith.It’s just something else for The NAACP to use.against the State.They don’t want the white Folks and Black folks to get along, they wouldn’t be in business if they did.

Response:

Lillian Stevens Young · Top Commenter · Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Stanley, maybe the statue is there b/c Meredith had COURAGE, the greatest of all attributes, IMO. And famous? In the struggle for civil rights, he certainly is famous. And you can argue whether the statue should be there not; that’s your right. But, the placing of a noose and a flag on the statue sends a message loud and clear, and it’s not one that I want my native state to send. I agree that many (most?) of our current so called civil rights leaders want the race tensions to continue; otherwise, they’d be out of work. However, in this case, we don’t need their involvement to tell us what this means

Reply:

Stanley Beech · Top Commenter · Blackjack Dealer at Pearl River Resort

Lillian Stevens Young Why was the Georgia flag used?It sounds to me like someone did this just to set race relations back..Someone defaced a statue and there is a 25.000 dollar reward and five football players literally stomp a guys head in at a party and that is not considered a hate crime.This is really nothing to do with Meredith, it’s just something for the NAACP to use against the State of Mississippi, I doubt half of the leaders would even know who James Meredith is.Rest assured Al Sharpton will be down to get his recognition.

Response:

Lillian Stevens Young · Top Commenter · Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Stanley Beech <you think someone wants to set race relations back? I think you’re right — the idiots who put the noose and the flag there!! And, do I think those responsible should have been prosecuted for beating this student? Absolutely!!! But, in my opinion, the lack of prosecution by the authorities in Oxford has a lot more to do with the fact that the perpetrators are Ole Miss football players, and nothing to do with race

**********************************************************************************

I’m just saying

We live in a country where entertainment reigns supreme and football is arguably supreme in entertainment, especially in Mississippi. When you look at the discrepancy in the application, the enforcement of drug laws in this country, nationally, you can best believe that to the extent that leniency is shown to these young men who are part of a revenue generating apparatus that race has nothing to do with it. To suggest otherwise is to provide cover for the Stormfront crowd. As for putting Civil Rights leaders out of work, as long as there are George Zimmermans and Michael Dunns running around and as long as you have people who can’t see the connection between the flag that was draped on the Meredith statue and the noose to the Mississippi state flag

and how conducive it is to memorialization of supremacist images and acts white supremacists can appreciate and moderates take the opportunity to join with them in criticism of the NAACP or seize the opportunity to fly the “civil-rights-leaders-want-the-race tensions-to-continue banner” then there will be work for Civil Rights leaders.

In the 60’s Martin Luther King Jr. said

“We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God given rights” 

Variations of confederate battle flags were the rallying symbols of resistance to this goal.  The white-southerner’s response in Mississippi to full black participation in public life was redemption and the adoption of a flag created by supremacists memorializing the effort to do as they please regarding the ownership of human beings.  In Mississippi that selection was affirmed by an overwhelming white-majority years after MLK’s assassination.  And the mental and emotional support that Mississippi’s state flag lends to the Meredith statue desecration, the recognition of legacy on the part of the offenders is something that perhaps you could criticize the current Civil Rights leaders for not noting.  But don’t expect it from moderates who are never really ready for trouble-makers who abhor supremacist symbols.  No, they, the moderates are more likely to defend such tax-supported symbols of states as respect of tradition.  They must then also recognize the psychic support such symbols extend and the predictable consequences of cherishing such a legacy. 

All to capture a unicorn or

How to shrink the voting pool while hiding under a racist voter-integrity cloak

 

The search for the in-person-fraudulent voter is like the search for the unicorn.  In Mississippi though the local paper calls the white-majority’s voter ID law a “mandate,” as if to suggest a voting “mandate” in Mississippi where 46% of Republicans are against inter-racial marriage is not questionable, the minions of ALEC have yet to display the reason for their intense interest in “voter integrity.” They have yet to publicly display the unicorns, I mean the in-person-fraudulent voters who are running rampant. We won’t get into how many devils were in the details of the Republican-crafted law, the photo-ID law, when compared to the initiative which the paper describes as a “mandate.”  So “the mandate” was for what exactly? Now compare that to the law that was produced? 

But continuing with the farce, here’s another question.  Without evidence of need which you would think would be a foundation for spending in excess of $1.5 million why would

“Legislators set aside money during the 2013 session for the secretary of state’s office to buy cameras to take pictures for the IDs. Hosemann [Mississippi Secretary of State, Delbert] said the cameras will be distributed in December to 92 circuit clerks’ offices. Mississippi has 82 counties, and 10 of those have two courthouses. In early 2014, Hosemann’s office will provide training about the voter ID law and procedures for circuit clerks and election commissioners.” 

And Hosemann and “other supporters say requiring ID will prevent people from masquerading as others to vote,” a prevarication so bold that it lays bear the racists intent of the law in a state where every statewide office holder save one is Republican (the party to which the Dixicrats migrated) and both the House and the Senate is controlled by Republicans.     

Far more than an expensive dalliance of the fiscally irresponsible RepubliCON party ($1.5 million and counting for the photo-ID law not to mention refusing to expand Medicaid as disproportionate share payments disappear),

the photo-ID law implies that the Republicans have be stealing elections via in-person fraudulent voting. 

So after careful thought, fair-play, voter-integrity and racially sensitive Mississippi which only “voted to ratify the [13th]amendment in 1995 but failed to make it official by notifying the U.S. Archivist,” created a vote-Nazi.  In yet another illustration of how contented the African-American population in Mississippi is, they weren’t the ones who discovered or made noise about this oversight. 

But puzzling is how a state can deny an American citizen the right to voter without due process.  I mean a government certification of my birth is not determinative of my citizenship.  So what’s the point of forcing me to produce a birth certificate before I can vote? 

I don’t have to be born in America to be an American citizen.  Just ask John McCain or Ted Cruz. 

When the majority changes in this country, as surely it will, these guilty-until-proven-innocent laws will be repealed, laws which where non-existent until white majorities began to feel dominance slip away.   News Flash!!!  You can’t spend in excess of $1.5 million to capture unicorns, I mean stop non-existent in-person voter fraud and be viewed as either fiscally conservative or believers in democracy.  In the words of a true believer

“The Celestial Empire, the mystery of ages, is being solved. The fiat of the Almighty, “Let there be Light,” has not yet spent its force. No abuse, no outrage whether in taste, sport or avarice, can now hide itself from the all-pervading light.”

Truly and well-spoken brother Douglass. 

This farce known as photo-ID will too pass into the dark dust bin of history like it’s ancestors, slavery and Jim Crow, for His truth is marching on. 

▶ Wont Get Fooled Again – YouTube

 

or will we?

“plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose”

“The more things change, the more they stay the same” –  Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr

Mississippi Republicans’ masterful utilization of the levers of power, i.e. being able to have U.S. Senators at their beck and call for Yokohama officials (Yokohama Tire Corporation is the North American manufacturing and marketing arm of Tokyo, Japan-based The Yokohama Rubber Co. Ltd.) reveals the true power structure, ancient and plutocratic in nature, of the state (see Jeff Pender’s story, “Landing Clay County tire plant was no easy task,” from the Clarion Ledger 4-27-13). The Governor of the state even gave the Yokohama representatives gifts “paid by private funds.” (Who were the private sector players who provided funds for the Japan junket and what were their motivations?; what did they get or do they hope to get for their investment, since we know that according to conservatives the only motivation for men is self-interest, this being the driver of the free-market?) On what do they get first dibs? What inside information do they get or fast track to supplier contracts will be coming their way. Is their identity a matter of public record? Funny how small government really means government by the few.

 

It looks like the supposed small-government crowd (at least those are the rank and file people who elected a Republican-dominated Mississippi state house, House of Representatives and Senate, and Republicans to every state-wide office except Attorney General believe they are) is now getting “big government” legislation. RepubliCons passed legislation which effectively bans abortion despite recent overwhelming defeat of a personhood initiative which would have effectively banned abortion. How’s that for the will of a few controlling “big government” so that government determines that a woman has no right to decide with her doctor what to do with her body? And now a few men have drawn up a plan to give millions of dollars to a Japanese company and presented it, fully developed, to the legislature for rubber-stamping (“The approach we take with confidentiality is tight-lipped, driven by the commitment we have made to the company with regard to confidentiality- remarked Sally of the Mississippi Development Authority of the secrecy involved before a “a closed and confidential briefing,” according to an article, “Tire plant seen as big jobs producer in the Clarion Ledger, 4-25-2013.

There is not one TEA (taxed-enough already) party scheduled to protest this “big-government” plan. And the Teabagger’s were the crowd that protested so loudly about not knowing what was in the Affordable Care Act. The levers of power in Mississippi are still controlled by a few Oligarchs or Plutocrats, the same as it ever was and the rank and file Republican is satisfied with merely carrying the Republican name.

Mississippi today bears a striking resemblance to Mississippi before the Civil War, where a few wealthy men dictated the course of government, with none-slaving owning lemmings following because of their possible slave-owning potential, 19th century trickle-down economics which also sustained the class structure. The average Mississippi Republican, like the Mississippi Democrats before the Civil War (blacks didn’t get the right to vote until after the war and the Redemption essentially eviscerated the black franchise in the south until the 1960’s), isn’t against big government if the “right” people are in positions of authority perpetuating the status quo, i.e. slow economic growth channeled through a private sector which segregates itself at every opportunity and deplorably under-funds the education system which militates against the development of a truly well-educated (economically and politically)citizenry. The reason you won’t see any TEA party rallies against the Yokohama tire plant “give-away” is because the Heritage clones at the Mississippi Public Policy Center couldn’t generate a whimper from the supposed anti-big-government Mississippi Republicans who are too poor and uneducated (economically and politically) to respond to anything but dog whistles (see my previous post on the dog whistle that kills bugs.)* The Mississippi Public Policy Center can only get a rise out of the racially-responsive population when that population can hear the dog whistle (say ObamaCare or Obama anything in Mississippi and you have blown the whistle)

At the heart of attacks on government, for southerners, and the reason it has a special appeal in the south, is that the attack is an ancient appeal to racial supremacy. It was “Big Government” intervention in the south, interfering with the southern way of life through first trying to maintain the Union and then through Reconstruction, which necessitated the Redemption (In the 1870s, the Southern Democrats exercised power through paramilitary organizations such as the White League and Red Shirts, especially in Louisiana and Mississippi, respectively. The Red Shirts were also active in North Carolina. These paramilitary groups turned out Republican (who were affiliated with the north and freedmen rights) officeholders and terrorized and assassinated other freedmen and their allies to suppress voting. –see Wiki entry on Redeemers). To this day, the flag which was adopted after a massive, horrifically violent post-Reconstruction disenfranchisement period (in 1894) remains as the symbol of white supremacy.  The Mississippi flag is a symbol of planned, structural exclusion.  Those responsible for maintenance of that structural exclusion responded to school integration with a Sovereignty Commission. That structural exclusion, today, has vestiges in schools that were formed as Seg-Academies. That structural exclusion did crack a bit when the University of Mississippi, recognizing the economic impact of not being able to attract many talented black athletes, got rid of the battle flag of the Army of Northern Virginia (Confederate flag) from its sporting events.  The racist superstructure (the underlying power structure) is part of the reason funds can never be found to sufficiently, continuously fund the Adequate Education Fund in Mississippi. The superstructure is a manifestation of the racial-purity philosophy which was the goal and legacy of the Klan in Mississippi. In keeping something pure (communities, schools, etc.) like keeping government small, something most be excluded, something must be kept out. Now this exclusion is in effect a shrinking of opportunity for training and economic mobility, which can be readily accomplished in a segregated (in terms of employment opportunities) private sector, which ideally you, as a small-government advocate, would want to expand while shrinking or “drowning” in a bathtub the government sector (with its more egalitarian proclivities and determination to monitor inclusiveness and insure diversity and access to opportunity). Of course the diminished or constricted educational funding will have some white, expendable, casualties as well but this simply reinforces the classism but using poor whites as a buffer and shock troops in the political battle to maintain the status quo.

Underfunding education (as in purposely siphoning some of its funding off to fund charter schools) gives the true ruling elite two obvious advantages. First the pool of people competing with them intellectually is constricted through access depravation which makes the dog whistle more effective as supposed racial inferiority becomes superficially evident. The distraction of race allows for a concentration, a concentration facilitated through trade agreements which eviscerate the middle class, of resources into fewer hands. These resources are channeled away from un-educated and under-educated whites through trade agreements which ship jobs overseas depleting the tax base and with it funds for education. The un-educated and under-educated whites don’t know that they have the power to affect these decisions and accept their plight as just a matter of markets at work and are vulnerable to appeals to “entitlement reform” as minorities are viewed as the principal recipients of their tax dollars and that they are Taxed Enough Already. Playing up the notion that the wealth of the nation is being greatly dissipated by entitlement programs or by “welfare queens” is a perfect distraction like the Jesse Helms sponsored Harvey Gant commercial, all the while corporations and wealthy individuals stash billions off-shore and companies, sitting on trillions of dollars display the true blue-smoke-and-mirrors essence of trickle-down economics. Secondly, they, elite white men, the upper-class, firmly in control of the bulk of the capital, can dole out resources (through campaign support and jobs) in the private sector to re-enforce and animate their political views about school funding, abortion clinics, state-approved prayer, etc. The South’s economic drag on the American economy is the price the country must pay for turning its back on the American South for almost 100 years after the Civil War, and allowing a class of white southerners to resist changes that would have enriched the region far faster by keeping a lot of talent here to bloom and ripen. So when you think Yokohama, think how that could have been an American plant with union labor years ago if certain men had not been so successful in fanning the flames of white-hot white supremacy which enriched the upper echelons, retarded labor development and contributed not only to a brain and talent drain which continues to this day but to the under-development of so many of the minds that remained.

*According to Sam R. Hall of the Clarion Ledger in Jackson, Ms., the Milliman study is

“a Dec. 7 report prepared for the Division of Medicaid by Milliman Inc. The report, of course, looks at the costs to the state for expanding Medicaid

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant sent the report to Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and Speaker Philip Gunn on Friday, according to the letter attached to the report.”

The report refers to Mississippians or people who currently quality for Medicaid but are not covered as if they were insects or bugs who would come out of the woodwork when it refers to a Woodwork affect as follows:

Woodwork effect
Milliman’s study also includes what he calls the “woodwork effect,” an allusion to people who currently quality for Medicaid but are not covered and will “come out of the woodwork” to qualify because of new changes affecting people without insurance.
Milliman predicts the following costs over the seven-year period, regardless of the state’s decision to expand Medicaid:
• 60 percent: $319 million
• 80 percent: $413 million
• 100 percent: $474 million

Bryant orders 10 HMA hospitals back into Blue Cross network | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

I cannot sit back and allow Mississippians’ access to care to be threatened in violation of state law

What business does any public official have in trying to make certain that citizens have access to medical care? How can a business be compelled to provide a “product in a marketplace at the insistence” of government?
And don’t you remember how, in an effort to support the efficacy of markets in meeting the needs of Americans, RepubliCons said that:

“[t]here is no one who doesn’t have health care in America. No one. Now, they may end up going to the emergency room?”

So what’s all the fuss about insurance companies deciding not to do business with some hospitals because they “charge too much?” Isn’t this just the marketplace at work? Shouldn’t insurance companies be allowed to seek profit like all good capitalists? What’s with the dictatorial intervention? Weren’t the Teabaggers carrying signs of President Obama with Hitler mustaches drawn on his face because of his market interventions? What’s with the government intrusion embodied in the Mississippi Patient Protection Act of 1995?” What’s with the government telling businesses what they must provide? This situation makes a point emphatically. Specifically, the issue is that capitalism is a system devised by man and subject to modifications and variations necessary to serve the people. This democratic Republic, America, is served by capitalism. The Republic is not the servant of capitalism. This is a fact that the conservatives, indoctrinated within the last thirty years, must learn. The more sophisticated conservatives know this which is why they spend so much time lobbying to make laws (modifications and variations) which concentrate capital in relatively few hands while pretending that capitalism just happens to naturally support the trade deficits enhanced by this “service economy” that they have convinced the public is most desirable for America. This salesmanship of substandard economic conditions explains why many Americans’ desired to keep the insurance plans that they had before enactment of the Affordable Care Act, a situation that could be compared to domestic abuse. The form of capitalism practiced in this country is designed and modified by men; it is not some natural, organic formation sent to us by God. If our form of capitalism is so superior then why do we find ourselves begging other countries with much more socialism (government mandated health care) in their economies for jobs?

It is ironic how conservative governors from southern states who complain about government thwarting private markets and competition spend time and state resources pursuing Japanese investment in their states when according to author T.R. Reid in “The Healing of America, “[d]espite universal coverage and prodigious consumption, Japan spends a lot less for health care that most of the developed nations; with costs running at about 8 percent of GDP, it spends about half as much as the United States.” And get this Teabaggers, the Japanese require everyone to sign up. They call it a personal mandate. The irony is that so called conservatives are attacking personal responsibility and seeking investment from people (foreign capitalists?) who make certain that all of their citizens have health care while complaining about a “’woodwork effect,’ an allusion to people [American citizens] who currently quality for Medicaid but are not covered and will ‘come out of the woodwork’ to qualify because of new changes affecting people without insurance.” Just think about that for a moment. Here you have Americans alluded to as bugs, as insects who will come out of the “woodwork” to get what, crumbs? Actually CONservatives, [see Mitt Romney and Steel Dynamics] are very skilled at getting government to assist them while pretending that the resources that they get, they got all by themselves when they have really benefited for jobs programs, activities subsidized in one fashion or another by a government of the people. Their brilliance is in their ability to convince their constituents that they don’t need the government while channeling government to assist their constituents. You even have a private entity Blue Cross/Blue Shield complaining about constituent services: complaining that “the hospital management company [with whom the big insurer has a dispute] and its lobbyists have donated thousands of dollars in “political contributions” to the governor.”

The health care conversation is Mississippi doesn’t just smell of classism, it reeks of elitism. The political establishment is fighting to maintain health care access for one group of Mississippians while being willing to in the words of a local reporter who’s been covering the Mississippi health care struggle for the Clarion Ledger in Jackson, Ms., Sam R. Hall , to ignore “the loss of DSH payments” which “would equal nearly $1.4 billion” [these are federal funds paid to the state to help cover indigent care in hospitals which are scheduled to go away] and not expand Medicaid. In the words of Mr. Hall

“[t]hat’s $400 million more than if every single eligible Mississippian allowed joined after expanding the Medicaid program, and we know that’s 100 percent will never join.”

Pew!!!! We can’t just be imagining that smell. The state of Mississippi while begging for jobs from a country with universal health care continues to refuse to assist Mississippians making more than $5,500 per year, the Medical cutoff, get health care while compelling a private insurer to provide health care access for Mississippians making considerable more than $5,500, Mississippians making enough to afford a BCBS policy.

Remarkable still is the protestations about big government involvement in Mississippi and assertions of state’s rights (in the antebellum southern spirit) even to the point where Senator Thad Cochran will now face a Teabagger opponent even as a “proportion of federal spending in Mississippi is directed toward large federal installations such as Camp Shelby, John C. Stennis Space Center, Meridian Naval Air Station, Columbus Air Force Base, and Keesler Air Force Base.” And there are also the private sector extensions of the military industrial complex like Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi.
To ignore Tip O’Neill’s maxim, “all politics is local,” is to abandon the field to the Teabaggers who are the servants, wittingly or unwittingly, of the neo-feudalists who are ordering society in a fashion that produces less social mobility. And access to health care, if you look at the rest of the industrialized world, is critical to that dream as it provides the foundation for productivity so that “you can build that,” that being whatever your dream is.

Bryant orders 10 HMA hospitals back into Blue Cross network | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Hosemann’s allies are the black middle and upper class in Mississippi

Hosemann [Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann] said Mississippi took precautions to make sure its voter ID law would survive scrutiny, offering free photos for the ID cards, free transportation to get the cards and free verification for birth certificates in Mississippi and 45 other states

Using what is by now the trademark RepubliCon tool, Delbert Hosemann and his fellow Council of Conservative Citizens have employed the divide and conquer voodoo to perfection in the 21st century extension of the Southern Strategy, the voter ID booby trap. The key is to make one group of people turn on another group with whom they should be economic allies. The devilry is the questions what is free and for whom is it free?

Connecting a current driver’s license (which, duh, is not free) to voting as Mississippi’s Weyrich-flavored constriction is an income hoop reminiscent of a poll tax, especially in a state in which the Non-Hispanic white households in Mississippi had the highest median household income ($45,583) and the median household income of blacks—$23,895—was just over half of that according to work from 2009 by the VCU Center on Society and Health. ,a state in which $5,501 is too much income to qualify for Medicaid. What is free in Mississippi, a state receiving the third most federal funding per tax dollar paid, is in the eye of the beholder or motor vehicle operator as the case may be.

But the voting pool contraction is predictable, considering how neo-feudalism is a derivative of a plantation-sympathetic society which many Mississippians cherish as part of their tradition embodied in the state flag. Class is very much the essence of neo-feudalism the same as it was at the base of anti-bellum southern life. No, that correlation is not a surprise but the black contribution to Mississippi’s status quo is perhaps an insidious indication of how deeply a primitive, pernicious style of capitalism, American to its core, has the potential to devour democracy. Strange bedfellows, the black middle and upper classes and the founders of Heritage, Cato, and ALEC like Paul Weyrich, lovers of elitism and stratification. 

No one, not even anyone in the Mississippi Civil Rights community or even in the Black legislative caucus in Mississippi seems to be willing to challenge Hosemann’s assertion about the poll he took to determine how many people had the type of photo ID necessary to vote in Mississippi. Hosemann’s assertions considering the way he came to help alter the cost estimates of the voter ID law from the initial $100,000 to the $1.5 million, even that figure is suspect (The state’s voter ID initiative stated that providing free IDs could cost up to $100,000, depending on how many people requested one.), his aiding and abetting this discrimination proves how right Faulkner was about the past. And I betcha the $1.5 million estimate didn’t account for this: “The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal reported that the state will have to put cameras in all 82 county courthouses to monitor the distribution of the free voter IDs. The Legislature would have to set aside funds to buy these cameras; however, lawmakers did not approve funds for the cameras during the 2012 session.) No, Herr Hosemann’s belated interest in disparate impact is about as legitimate as a cotton gin owner who has his house on the scale. He needs a look-the-other-way complicity to make the presentation work. You have to give him credit for determining where he could count on getting this assistance, the black political class system in Mississippi, conveniently retiring.

A complacent, contented black middle and upper class is what makes the gentlemanly South’s-gonna-rise-again types like Hosemann so effective. It is black lethargy and acquiescence to a perceived black inferiority among lower income blacks that makes the closeted Council of Conservative Citizens members so effective in their efforts to suppress the vote. One has to begin to believe that many blacks are also neo-feudalists, harboring classist sentiments, enjoying a black cushion like Supreme Court Justice Thomas who having benefited from affirmative action even to point of accepting a position on the Supreme Court now thinks that “the others” are just plain ole inferior, in a sense, mirroring the perspective of blacks who owned slaves before the Civil War. Everything is fine just so long as I can get and maintain my economic advantage. Little do they realize that they, having forgotten the lessons of the past, may find themselves one day spending, paraphrasing the title from a recent film, more than just 12 years a slave because “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice every where.” The lessons of the past are telling everyone who stands idly, silently by and watches these erosions in voting rights that one day “they” will be coming for you.

Groups say Mississippi should take lesson from voting-law challenges | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

I believe Mississippi’s law is much different than North Carolina’s, and we will pass any constitutional challenge by anyone,” he [Ms. Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann] said. “We are not going to be discriminatory against minorities in Mississippi … We are not our fathers’ fathers in Mississippi anymore.

Oh really, and what do you call the Jim Crow styled hoops created by Mississippi’s law.   Hosemann denies the photo ID law’s discriminatory effect despite the fact that people who have driver’s licenses are shielded from having to provide a birth certificate to get a “free” state-issued photo ID.  This actually produces two classes of citizens, one forced to produce some sort of documentation to obtain a birth certificate to vote.  Of course none of the media in Mississippi seems to have paid any attention to Hosemann’s attempts at deception by using Georgia’s law as a defense for Mississippi’s efforts and some of the media in Mississippi has even given cover to this nullification effort by the state which has “the sole remaining U.S. state flag which bears the Confederate battle flag’s saltire.”    

When news sources say “Voters overwhelmingly approved Voter ID in 2011 in a statewide referendum,” the common refrain from the press in Mississippi, no one ever compares the ID initiative that was passed, which made no reference to exclusions from obtaining “free” ID,to the exclusionary law the RepubliCon Mississippi Legislature enacted. The Mississippi voter disintegration law (registered Mississippians are suddenly ineligible to vote if their driver’s license is expired) also has, paraphrasing a line for the recent Lincoln film, clothed the Secretary of State in immense power. Peek-a-boo, what’s that hiding in the law?  Revealing the latent southern predilection for autocracy, the law says required material presented and verified for ID issuance could be “Such other acceptable evidence of verification of residence in the county as determined by the Secretary of State.” This means that, through an electorate’s atavistic reliance on a plantation-styled noblesse oblige, today’s Secretary of State can decide that a paystub is good enough to acquire a photo ID and the next SOS can decide that its not? Having Mississippi’s legislatively-created Fuhrer decide what is “acceptable evidence of verification” kind of reminds me of the Soup Nazi episode of Seinfeld. Only in Mississippi it may be “no vote for you.”  And if you are a married woman what exactly will the Fuhrer require you to produce, by way of documentation, to get one of those “free” IDs? 

 

WASHINGTON – Voting rights advocates say there’s a message for Mississippi in lawsuits the Justice Department has filed during the last two months to block voting-law changes in Texas and North Carolina.

The suits claim the changes, including new voter ID laws, would suppress the minority vote.

Mississippi is moving ahead with its own voter ID law, and voting rights advocates say the recent legal actions by the Justice Department should put the state on notice that it may be next.

“The battle in North Carolina, Texas, they’re not just state fights,” said William Barber, president of the North Carolina NAACP. “They are state battles that have national implications. If you don’t stop it here, it has the potential like a virus to spread across the country.”

But Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann said his state’s voter ID law is on solid footing.

“I believe Mississippi’s law is much different than North Carolina’s, and we will pass any constitutional challenge by anyone,” he said. “We are not going to be discriminatory against minorities in Mississippi … We are not our fathers’ fathers in Mississippi anymore.”

Hosemann said Mississippi’s law should be in place by June.

Justice officials filed the recent lawsuits against Texas and North Carolina in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling this summer in a case out of Shelby County, Ala.

Until that ruling, Mississippi and other states with a history of discrimination were required under Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act to get “pre-clearance” from the Justice Department or a federal court before making any change to their voting procedures.

The court ruled that Section 4 of the act, which consisted of the formula used to determine which states and other jurisdictions should be subject to Section 5, is outdated and therefore unconstitutional.

Justice officials were reviewing Mississippi’s voter ID law when the court issued its ruling. The law requires voters to show a government-issued photo ID at the polls. Before the ruling, Justice officials had rejected similar laws in other Southern states subject to Section 5.

(Page 2 of 2)

Voting rights advocates said they were alarmed by how quickly Mississippi and other states moved to implement their new voting laws after the court decision.

Mississippi “didn’t even stop to take a breath after the decision before rushing forward” on its voter ID law, said Wendy Weiser, director of the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law.

Weiser said that makes her think states won’t be easily deterred, even in the face of legal challenges.

“It’s not clear to me how much those states currently are going to be slowed by the existence of lawsuits because they really did just thumb their nose at the Voting Rights Act,” she said. “That said, it certainly ought to have an impact.”

Hosemann said Mississippi took precautions to make sure its voter ID law would survive scrutiny, offering free photos for the ID cards, free transportation to get the cards and free verification for birth certificates in Mississippi and 45 other states.

The state also conducted a poll to determine who might not have IDs and how to target them.

“It’s very clear to us which people don’t have IDs, and we have devised a process to find each and every one of them and we intend to do that,” Hosemann said.

Hosemann said North Carolina’s election law is very different from the one Mississippi voters approved in 2011. In addition to a requirement that voters have a government-issued photo ID, North Carolina’s law also reduced the early-voting period and prohibited voter registration on Election Day, known as same-day registration.

Mississippi does not offer same-day registration or early voting, except for disabled people and seniors, Hosemann said.

Hosemann said he’s not surprised Attorney General Eric Holder filed the lawsuits against the changes in Texas and North Carolina.

“He’s been quite clear from the day the (Supreme Court) opinion came out that he intended to challenge every state,” Hosemann said. “I’m hopeful that our open hand to the Justice Department, our research and our regulations will deter an action against my state.”

The Mississippi NAACP has not said yet whether it would challenge the state law in court, but it has not ruled out legal action.

“The Mississippi voter ID law is just as oppressive as Texas’ and North Carolina’s voter ID laws,” said Carroll Rhodes, general counsel for the Mississippi NAACP. “The same actions being taken by affected voters and the Justice Department in those states should be explored in Mississippi.”

Edward Hailes, general counsel with the Advancement Project, said the national group would work with the Mississippi NAACP and others if there’s a challenge to the state’s law.

“North Carolina is ground zero for us, but other states are responding to the Shelby County decision by promulgating new laws, so we’re going to have to look at all of them depending on the resources we have,” he said.

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Groups say Mississippi should take lesson from voting-law challenges | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Bryant trusts no part of health care overhaul | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

some low-level employees or volunteers with the exchange could unilaterally force the state to expand Medicaid, the longstanding federal-state health insurance program for the needy,

reads this article from the Clarion Ledger is Jackson, Mississippi.

This is being given as a reason for not supporting the Affordable Care Act in Mississippi:  “the navigators could unilaterally decide to sign people up for Medicaid, even if they earn too much money to qualify.” 

In the minds of some Mississippians the navigators, people who “are available to help people understand various levels of coverage available through an exchange” could sign people up for Medicaid, giving health care to someone who makes more than $5,500 per year, the income cutoff in Mississippi. You got that right.  In Mississippi some people believe that the navigators could expand Medicaid.  There seems to be a concerted effort by the neo-feudalists to constrict access to health care, in a state in which 1 in four adults lack health insurance including “one in three among adults 44 or younger.” In Mississippi “less than half the employers even offer insurance.”  The pretense that all is well and Mississippi should just not address the problem is indicative of the delusional southern mind that contributes to the state’s position nationally.  Talk about burying you head in the sand when it comes to health care. 

You see Mississippi is one of those places where officials rail against an agenda “controlled by Washington” when it comes to health care while lobbying to get more military institutions which are controlled by Washington.  Conservatives aren’t really against government.  They don’t really want smaller government.  They just want to be able to target the government expenditures toward the areas that they or their friends can derive the greatest benefit.  They have a preference for oligarchs and neo-feudalism where they channel the collective resources to themselves and their Heritage Fund protected masters and everyone can just go to them for “charity.”  

Bryant trusts no part of health care overhaul | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com