Tag Archives: Photo ID

Where was he looking? And what does he mean, “we”?

“We found no one was denied the right to vote in Mississippi,” crowed Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann after Mississippi’s photo ID law was used in June 2014. Yet of the 513 people who cast affidavit ballots in June 2014 in Mississippi, 177, jumped through the newly created photo-ID hoop, returning to prove that they were not guilty of attempted voter fraud by presenting a government-approved photo ID. Of the 513, according to the vote Nazi, Hosemann, “13 had their ballots rejected for other reasons, such as not being a registered voter.” So there you have 323 registered voters who were possibly denied the right to vote.

“We are very pleased with the numbers,” he said. “They reflect Mississippi is able to conduct its own elections.”

“We” definitely doesn’t include the people who were registered to vote but couldn’t or didn’t because someone else decided that their previous efforts to participate in this Democratic Republic weren’t sufficient. In the words of a great Civil Rights activist, “Is this America?”

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Blacks elitists abetting racist’s plans(Black overseers)

When I see George Flaggs’, Vicksburg, Ms.’s African-American mayor’s advocacy for photo ID,1 I think of Fannie Lou Hammer response to Lyndon Johnson’s proposed compromise on democratic participation: “we didn’t come this far for no two seats.”2 When I hear prominent local African-American officials in Mississippi’s capital city call the law “painless,”3 I think did we “come this far for two seats,” even as the spiritual descendants of the Dixicrats fight to prevent Medicaid expansion, successfully imposing disparate impact.  When I see the initiative that led to photo ID in Mississippi and realize that the people who signed the petition didn’t show photo ID when signing the petition, I think did we come this far for “two seats?”  When I see prominent members of the African-American community fighting to save an incumbent Republican U.S. senator4 who cast his lot with anti-ACA stalwarts, I think maybe we have come this far for “two seats.”  Race is a proxy for class. True class warfare is exposed when “less than 10% of voting age whites in Mississippi do not have a driver’s license (“the most common form of government-issued ID required to vote) while almost 30% of voting age blacks are without one.”

So when you see the following, remember the blacks in this commercial are working for someone who has been totally silent on voter constrictions and hasn’t done a thing to help expand Medicaid for the poorest state in the union. And whereas the actors in the commercial are getting paid and there are blacks who support voter suppression and the party that created it, other blacks are disproportionately affected by both of these exclusions. This exposes the survival-of-the-fittest mentality of black leadership even toward the people who are most likely to vote, when given a chance, for them. And whereas Senator Cochran was once dubbed the “King of Pork,” mind you even as blacks in Mississippi were still among the poorest in the nation and plants shut down and moved oversea, since President Obama has been in office Cochran has been about as useful to the state as Ted Cruz or Mike “laughingstock” Lee of Utah.

1. Mississippi Senate race muddles voter ID debate
ByJacqueline AlemanyCBS NEWSJune 23, 2014, 6:57 AM

2. 50 years later, right to vote still threatened: Column
Alan Draper 5:18 p.m. EDT August 26, 2014
Fannie Lou Hamer’s demand of protection for blacks’ right to a political voice still rings true today.

3. Mississippi sails through voter ID test
Emily Le Coz, The Clarion-Ledger 8:35 p.m. CDT June 3, 2014

4. G.O.P. Senator Courts Blacks in Mississippi Primary Race
By ASHLEY PARKER and JONATHAN MARTINJUNE 20, 2014

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Being hosed by Hosemann


It’s the old smallpox-in-the-blanket routine. This apparently is a comically, disarming sales gimmick meant to cast Mississippi’s neo-confederate voting restrictions as minority-friendly. Mr. Haney, I mean Secretary Hosemann, is still trying to favorably portray an ice-to-the-Eskimos- purchase, $1.5 million and counting to stop non-existent in-person voter fraud. Mr. Haney says that Mississippians can use driver’s licenses that are 10 years old, but that’s not what the neo-confederate devils wrote into the details of the law, smuggled-in law via a Trojan-horse initiative. And how long after Obama is out office do you think it will be before Mr. Haney is demanding strict adherence to the law and the neo-confederates add more birth-certificate-type requirements to obtain the “free” photo ID? Why photo ID? Just look at the lower-voting effect of these type laws on black and young people in Kansas and Tennessee.* For the shrewd confidence man, Mr. Haney, advancing voting constrictions is money in the bank (job security). Beautiful Mr. Haney, disenfranchisement wrapped in a voter-integrity blanket.

Oh, and below is the white version of the commercial that Hosemann ran, the forerunner of the ad he ran coincidently matching Cochran’s black appeal campaign. Funny how the Secretary of State’s office ran a black version of the ad to appeal to the voting segment most negatively impacted by the voting changes, a segment which could prove to be pivotal to Cochran’s re-election, if Tea Partier’s Chris McDaniel’s supporters, Cochran’s primary opponent, staged a protest campaign in the general election. Apparently using a black woman in the ad proves that the law couldn’t possibly be harmful to minorities.

*Study: Voter ID laws cut turnout by blacks, young

Groups say Mississippi should take lesson from voting-law challenges | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

I believe Mississippi’s law is much different than North Carolina’s, and we will pass any constitutional challenge by anyone,” he [Ms. Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann] said. “We are not going to be discriminatory against minorities in Mississippi … We are not our fathers’ fathers in Mississippi anymore.

Oh really, and what do you call the Jim Crow styled hoops created by Mississippi’s law.   Hosemann denies the photo ID law’s discriminatory effect despite the fact that people who have driver’s licenses are shielded from having to provide a birth certificate to get a “free” state-issued photo ID.  This actually produces two classes of citizens, one forced to produce some sort of documentation to obtain a birth certificate to vote.  Of course none of the media in Mississippi seems to have paid any attention to Hosemann’s attempts at deception by using Georgia’s law as a defense for Mississippi’s efforts and some of the media in Mississippi has even given cover to this nullification effort by the state which has “the sole remaining U.S. state flag which bears the Confederate battle flag’s saltire.”    

When news sources say “Voters overwhelmingly approved Voter ID in 2011 in a statewide referendum,” the common refrain from the press in Mississippi, no one ever compares the ID initiative that was passed, which made no reference to exclusions from obtaining “free” ID,to the exclusionary law the RepubliCon Mississippi Legislature enacted. The Mississippi voter disintegration law (registered Mississippians are suddenly ineligible to vote if their driver’s license is expired) also has, paraphrasing a line for the recent Lincoln film, clothed the Secretary of State in immense power. Peek-a-boo, what’s that hiding in the law?  Revealing the latent southern predilection for autocracy, the law says required material presented and verified for ID issuance could be “Such other acceptable evidence of verification of residence in the county as determined by the Secretary of State.” This means that, through an electorate’s atavistic reliance on a plantation-styled noblesse oblige, today’s Secretary of State can decide that a paystub is good enough to acquire a photo ID and the next SOS can decide that its not? Having Mississippi’s legislatively-created Fuhrer decide what is “acceptable evidence of verification” kind of reminds me of the Soup Nazi episode of Seinfeld. Only in Mississippi it may be “no vote for you.”  And if you are a married woman what exactly will the Fuhrer require you to produce, by way of documentation, to get one of those “free” IDs? 

 

WASHINGTON – Voting rights advocates say there’s a message for Mississippi in lawsuits the Justice Department has filed during the last two months to block voting-law changes in Texas and North Carolina.

The suits claim the changes, including new voter ID laws, would suppress the minority vote.

Mississippi is moving ahead with its own voter ID law, and voting rights advocates say the recent legal actions by the Justice Department should put the state on notice that it may be next.

“The battle in North Carolina, Texas, they’re not just state fights,” said William Barber, president of the North Carolina NAACP. “They are state battles that have national implications. If you don’t stop it here, it has the potential like a virus to spread across the country.”

But Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann said his state’s voter ID law is on solid footing.

“I believe Mississippi’s law is much different than North Carolina’s, and we will pass any constitutional challenge by anyone,” he said. “We are not going to be discriminatory against minorities in Mississippi … We are not our fathers’ fathers in Mississippi anymore.”

Hosemann said Mississippi’s law should be in place by June.

Justice officials filed the recent lawsuits against Texas and North Carolina in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling this summer in a case out of Shelby County, Ala.

Until that ruling, Mississippi and other states with a history of discrimination were required under Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act to get “pre-clearance” from the Justice Department or a federal court before making any change to their voting procedures.

The court ruled that Section 4 of the act, which consisted of the formula used to determine which states and other jurisdictions should be subject to Section 5, is outdated and therefore unconstitutional.

Justice officials were reviewing Mississippi’s voter ID law when the court issued its ruling. The law requires voters to show a government-issued photo ID at the polls. Before the ruling, Justice officials had rejected similar laws in other Southern states subject to Section 5.

(Page 2 of 2)

Voting rights advocates said they were alarmed by how quickly Mississippi and other states moved to implement their new voting laws after the court decision.

Mississippi “didn’t even stop to take a breath after the decision before rushing forward” on its voter ID law, said Wendy Weiser, director of the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law.

Weiser said that makes her think states won’t be easily deterred, even in the face of legal challenges.

“It’s not clear to me how much those states currently are going to be slowed by the existence of lawsuits because they really did just thumb their nose at the Voting Rights Act,” she said. “That said, it certainly ought to have an impact.”

Hosemann said Mississippi took precautions to make sure its voter ID law would survive scrutiny, offering free photos for the ID cards, free transportation to get the cards and free verification for birth certificates in Mississippi and 45 other states.

The state also conducted a poll to determine who might not have IDs and how to target them.

“It’s very clear to us which people don’t have IDs, and we have devised a process to find each and every one of them and we intend to do that,” Hosemann said.

Hosemann said North Carolina’s election law is very different from the one Mississippi voters approved in 2011. In addition to a requirement that voters have a government-issued photo ID, North Carolina’s law also reduced the early-voting period and prohibited voter registration on Election Day, known as same-day registration.

Mississippi does not offer same-day registration or early voting, except for disabled people and seniors, Hosemann said.

Hosemann said he’s not surprised Attorney General Eric Holder filed the lawsuits against the changes in Texas and North Carolina.

“He’s been quite clear from the day the (Supreme Court) opinion came out that he intended to challenge every state,” Hosemann said. “I’m hopeful that our open hand to the Justice Department, our research and our regulations will deter an action against my state.”

The Mississippi NAACP has not said yet whether it would challenge the state law in court, but it has not ruled out legal action.

“The Mississippi voter ID law is just as oppressive as Texas’ and North Carolina’s voter ID laws,” said Carroll Rhodes, general counsel for the Mississippi NAACP. “The same actions being taken by affected voters and the Justice Department in those states should be explored in Mississippi.”

Edward Hailes, general counsel with the Advancement Project, said the national group would work with the Mississippi NAACP and others if there’s a challenge to the state’s law.

“North Carolina is ground zero for us, but other states are responding to the Shelby County decision by promulgating new laws, so we’re going to have to look at all of them depending on the resources we have,” he said.

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Groups say Mississippi should take lesson from voting-law challenges | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Herr Hosemann, Brother Faulkner has a message for you!

“We’re not the same old Mississippi that our fathers’ fathers were,” Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, a Republican, declared hours after the Supreme Court handed down its June 25 decision in a case from Shelby County

Oh, really?  Then why would Mississippi Republican lawmakers advocate an initiative to address non-existent in-person voter fraud.  I say non-existent unless Herr Hosemann, the Vote-Nazi, can prove that the Republican control of the state house and all state-wide political offices except for one is the result of in-person voter fraud.  “Not the same old Mississippi?” when tradition is so deified, when love of your “fathers’ fathers”  tyranny over black folk is so cherished that efforts to change  the Mississippi state flag (the sole remaining U.S. state flag which bears the Confederate battle flag’s saltire) the flag adopted in 1894 after the Klan drove blacks out of politics with killings and terror, efforts to change a flag infamously linked with slavery and the Klan were soundly defeated in 2001. 

You’re not the same old Mississippi as your fathers’ fathers but somehow like the literacy tests of years past and the jelly-beans-in-a-jar test and the bubbles-in-a-bar-of-soap quiz of your fathers’ fathers old South, you philosophical descendants of the Klan-run South have taken the initiative that was passed overwhelmingly by white voters, an initiative in which there is no mention of birth certificates, and made a birth-certificate hoop, a totally unnecessary requirement as production of the document is not necessary for citizenship, part of the voting process.

And then there is the typical victimization of the lesser members of the “superior” race by the propagandists.   Mississippi’s initiative law says

“The sponsor of an initiative shall identify in the text of the initiative the amount and source of revenue required to implement the initiative.” 

This Republican and former ALEC member Mississippi State Senator Joey Fillingane did by stating in the petition that “free photo identifications could cost the State of Mississippi up to $100,000 (one hundred thousand dollars) to be paid from the State General Fund”

However,

Fiscal Analysis
Prepared by the Mississippi Legislative Budget Office
Based on Fiscal Year 2010 information, the Department of Public Safety issued 107,094 photo IDs to U.S. citizens of voting age. The individuals were assessed $14 per ID to offset a portion of the $17.92 cost per ID. The cost is estimated to remain the same, but the assessment will no longer be allowable under the provision of Initiatve 27. Therefore, the Department of Public Safety is estimated to see a loss of revenue of approximately $1,499,000.

 

As for the characterization of politicians as racists in the next section, every bit as racists, just more cunning.
How? Try tying voting to income by giving “free” government IDs to people who don’t have driver’s licenses when you know the income gap between blacks and whites in the state of Mississippi. Who is more likely to be channeled into the citizenship-challenge process?
The Law as follows:
“No person shall be eligible for a Mississippi Voter Identification Card if the person has a valid unexpired Mississippi driver’s license”
was translated from The Initiative section:
“A qualified elector who does not have a government issued photo identification and who cannot afford such identification may obtain a state issued photo identification free of charge from the Mississippi Department of Public Safety.”

And the conservatives tacked on the citizenship challenge as the voters were not asked about a birth certificate hoop and did not request one.

Just as in the case of Jim Crow Mississippi, racists propagandists have used unfounded fear to further their political careers, suckling at the breast of government as officials, while soaking in political contributions as the people they’ve frightened suffer.  “Not the same old Mississippi as your fathers’ fathers?”  Republicans complain that there isn’t enough money to fund Medicaid expansion, while creating another bubbles-in-a-bar-of-soap quiz, which proves nothing in terms of definitively establishing citizenship while costing the poorest state in the union an initial $1.5 million while effectively accusing citizens of being non-citizens, requiring them to provide “your papers please” like people confined to a ghetto in Hitler’s Germany, obliterating their Americanism by telling them that their previous registration is insufficient to cast a ballot, telling them that they, like felons, can not vote. Now the “elector must show appropriate identifying documents required by the Mississippi Department of Public Safety as provided by law.”

Amazingly, the conservatives have, through fear, convinced white people in the state that everyone should be criminalized, shifting the burden of proof away from the state and to the individual, every citizen is now guilty until proven innocent. Well done, crypto-fascists(conservative Republicans), on succeeding in doing what Herr Goebbels did so well subdue the masses by targeting minorities.

 

Brother Faulkner you can say it again.

 

“The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”

Nothing eery about voter ID | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Nothing eery about voter ID | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com.

All of a sudden I saw it. It had reappeared on the internet, a defense of Mississippi’s photo ID law from a reader in Alabama. It was time to take another one down and perform an autopsy.

Inside the guts of “Nothing eery about voter ID”

Nothing eery about voter ID

Republican Playing Voted ID Games(2)

Deciding whether to believe the Brennan Center study which “estimated 48,000 low-income Mississippians could have trouble obtaining government-issued photo identification” or an afterthought-study (no federal observers, eligible voter percentages) which suggests only 21,855 Mississippians total would need one?

Mind you, the afterthought was prepared by proponents who requested $395,000 for poll-tax (driver’s licenses aren’t free and Mississippi’s unexpired license requirement is tantamount to a recurring voting fee) ID litigation and requested none for related education and outreach.

A very conservative figure for a Mississippi education and outreach program would be $200,000. Georgia’s costs $840,000 and featured radio and TV public service announcements, direct mail, and packages to government agencies. And then there’s this post-Civil War purge element: “a person can obtain the free voter ID card at a clerk’s office by presenting the same material accepted to register to vote.”

This Haneyism, after Mr. Haney from television’s “Green Acres,” masks the fundamental change in Mississippi voting requirements. Proponent, Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann knows full well that Mississippians didn’t need to present a birth certificate to register to vote before the disenfranchisement legislation, therefore this implied ease is most disingenuous. And where, Mr. Haney, is the money for the clerk’s office “to access birth records” and who will pay?

Registered voters have registration cards, and in signing a voter roll are affirming their identity, like swearing to tell the truth in a court of law (without showing a photo ID to the judge). Mississippi Republicans have in effect established the presumption of guilt in voting law and suggest cheating is rampant, when nearly every statewide official is, ahem, Republican.

Mississippi’s Photo ID

In reference to the Clarion Ledger opinion piece entitled “Republicans playing voter ID games”

I am responding to the following comment within the quotes (” “) on the piece

by Trenton Winford

” First, can you not simply reply to the actual post? This is ridiculous.

Second, I honestly do not care what Karl Rove does or does not do because he has no say in Mississippi policy. This is a Mississippi law. Period.

As for preventing something that is not a current problem, that is exactly what preventive medicine, health awareness campaigns, abstinence-plus sex ed, subsidies, etc. are. Do you have a problem with all of those, too? ”
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Of course Mississippi RepubliCons would like to convince the unaware that they “honestly do not care what Karl Rove does or does not do because he has no say in Mississippi policy. This is a Mississippi law. Period.”

The initiative which became the Mississippi photo ID law and which a Mississippi state Senator (Joey Filligane) originally put into circulation is oddly, nearly identical to ALEC model legislation. The average Mississippian didn’t know that and probably thinks the law was some sort of home-grown phenomenon. Although this in itself is an indication of the disingenuous faux-innocence which is the Mississippi mask, considering the ubiquity of the proliferation of these laws in RepubliCon spheres nationwide. Some Mississippians will pretend not to know that this voter constriction has been part of the national RepubliCon game plan for some time. And Mississippi Republicans who aren’t aware that they are running plays from this playbook must belong to that know-nothing, Rip-Van-Winkle-Tea party.