Tag Archives: Secretary of State

Democrats are Remarkably Lazy

Well, how else can you explain the Republican Party’s success at co-opting things Democrats fought to put in place? I referred to the Democratic Party as the originator of things that RepubliCons pretend to support in another piece (Ruining Government(The Great REpubliConned pastime) where I also posit the notion that the Republican plan is to castigate and undermine the functioning of government at every opportunity, as part of a grand privatization scheme benefiting an oligarchic donor class.
Here is a Mississippi example of this co-opting.

Look at these pictures

Hosemann PR campaign (3) 12PassRoadstudents974

Hosemann PR campaign (2) 04Class2196

These are pictures from Promote the Vote in Mississippi.

This next picture is a picture of the current Mississippi Secretary of State, Republican Delbert Hosemann congratulating a program participant.

hosemann PR campaign IMG_0088
The literature from Secretary Hosemann’s website says

Tightly aligned with the Mississippi Social Studies Framework and developed in cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Education, PTV’s curriculum consists of voter education lesson plans and activities developmentally appropriate and unique to each grade level. Along with the lessons, the PTV Mock Election allows students to experience voting for official statewide candidates in a simulated election prior to the actual General Election.

What’s missing in the “voter education lesson plan” is the part where the students produce a copy of there birth certificate to get an ID to vote, the new RepubliCon wrinkle. The wrinkle is evidence of the difference between the Democratic and Republican parties. The Republican Party having switched characteristics with the Democratic Party, after integration and the influx of blacks into the Democratic Party, is now the party of the “systematic and ingenious discrimination” that the Voting Rights Act was supposed to counter. In Mr. Hosemann, you have a man, co-opting a program, Promote the Vote, begun by a Democrat, Eric Clark, while simultaneously defending voting constrictions wherein people are forced to get birth certificates to vote. Although Hosemann, twisting to sanitize an odorous, offensive law, has come up with some sort of Administrative agreement that contradicts the actual law, restricting access to supposedly “free” IDs means that the IDs are not free and considering the differences in income related to race the law is definitely discriminatory. But perhaps in Mississippi, it doesn’t matter whether Democrats worked harder at not allowing Democratic plans which benefit the common man to be co-opted by Republicans. After all, if your define yourself by allegiance to a symbol of repression, an emblem of class for which race is a proxy, maybe we shall not overcome Lee Atwater’s analysis.

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Groups say Mississippi should take lesson from voting-law challenges | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

I believe Mississippi’s law is much different than North Carolina’s, and we will pass any constitutional challenge by anyone,” he [Ms. Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann] said. “We are not going to be discriminatory against minorities in Mississippi … We are not our fathers’ fathers in Mississippi anymore.

Oh really, and what do you call the Jim Crow styled hoops created by Mississippi’s law.   Hosemann denies the photo ID law’s discriminatory effect despite the fact that people who have driver’s licenses are shielded from having to provide a birth certificate to get a “free” state-issued photo ID.  This actually produces two classes of citizens, one forced to produce some sort of documentation to obtain a birth certificate to vote.  Of course none of the media in Mississippi seems to have paid any attention to Hosemann’s attempts at deception by using Georgia’s law as a defense for Mississippi’s efforts and some of the media in Mississippi has even given cover to this nullification effort by the state which has “the sole remaining U.S. state flag which bears the Confederate battle flag’s saltire.”    

When news sources say “Voters overwhelmingly approved Voter ID in 2011 in a statewide referendum,” the common refrain from the press in Mississippi, no one ever compares the ID initiative that was passed, which made no reference to exclusions from obtaining “free” ID,to the exclusionary law the RepubliCon Mississippi Legislature enacted. The Mississippi voter disintegration law (registered Mississippians are suddenly ineligible to vote if their driver’s license is expired) also has, paraphrasing a line for the recent Lincoln film, clothed the Secretary of State in immense power. Peek-a-boo, what’s that hiding in the law?  Revealing the latent southern predilection for autocracy, the law says required material presented and verified for ID issuance could be “Such other acceptable evidence of verification of residence in the county as determined by the Secretary of State.” This means that, through an electorate’s atavistic reliance on a plantation-styled noblesse oblige, today’s Secretary of State can decide that a paystub is good enough to acquire a photo ID and the next SOS can decide that its not? Having Mississippi’s legislatively-created Fuhrer decide what is “acceptable evidence of verification” kind of reminds me of the Soup Nazi episode of Seinfeld. Only in Mississippi it may be “no vote for you.”  And if you are a married woman what exactly will the Fuhrer require you to produce, by way of documentation, to get one of those “free” IDs? 

 

WASHINGTON – Voting rights advocates say there’s a message for Mississippi in lawsuits the Justice Department has filed during the last two months to block voting-law changes in Texas and North Carolina.

The suits claim the changes, including new voter ID laws, would suppress the minority vote.

Mississippi is moving ahead with its own voter ID law, and voting rights advocates say the recent legal actions by the Justice Department should put the state on notice that it may be next.

“The battle in North Carolina, Texas, they’re not just state fights,” said William Barber, president of the North Carolina NAACP. “They are state battles that have national implications. If you don’t stop it here, it has the potential like a virus to spread across the country.”

But Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann said his state’s voter ID law is on solid footing.

“I believe Mississippi’s law is much different than North Carolina’s, and we will pass any constitutional challenge by anyone,” he said. “We are not going to be discriminatory against minorities in Mississippi … We are not our fathers’ fathers in Mississippi anymore.”

Hosemann said Mississippi’s law should be in place by June.

Justice officials filed the recent lawsuits against Texas and North Carolina in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling this summer in a case out of Shelby County, Ala.

Until that ruling, Mississippi and other states with a history of discrimination were required under Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act to get “pre-clearance” from the Justice Department or a federal court before making any change to their voting procedures.

The court ruled that Section 4 of the act, which consisted of the formula used to determine which states and other jurisdictions should be subject to Section 5, is outdated and therefore unconstitutional.

Justice officials were reviewing Mississippi’s voter ID law when the court issued its ruling. The law requires voters to show a government-issued photo ID at the polls. Before the ruling, Justice officials had rejected similar laws in other Southern states subject to Section 5.

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Voting rights advocates said they were alarmed by how quickly Mississippi and other states moved to implement their new voting laws after the court decision.

Mississippi “didn’t even stop to take a breath after the decision before rushing forward” on its voter ID law, said Wendy Weiser, director of the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law.

Weiser said that makes her think states won’t be easily deterred, even in the face of legal challenges.

“It’s not clear to me how much those states currently are going to be slowed by the existence of lawsuits because they really did just thumb their nose at the Voting Rights Act,” she said. “That said, it certainly ought to have an impact.”

Hosemann said Mississippi took precautions to make sure its voter ID law would survive scrutiny, offering free photos for the ID cards, free transportation to get the cards and free verification for birth certificates in Mississippi and 45 other states.

The state also conducted a poll to determine who might not have IDs and how to target them.

“It’s very clear to us which people don’t have IDs, and we have devised a process to find each and every one of them and we intend to do that,” Hosemann said.

Hosemann said North Carolina’s election law is very different from the one Mississippi voters approved in 2011. In addition to a requirement that voters have a government-issued photo ID, North Carolina’s law also reduced the early-voting period and prohibited voter registration on Election Day, known as same-day registration.

Mississippi does not offer same-day registration or early voting, except for disabled people and seniors, Hosemann said.

Hosemann said he’s not surprised Attorney General Eric Holder filed the lawsuits against the changes in Texas and North Carolina.

“He’s been quite clear from the day the (Supreme Court) opinion came out that he intended to challenge every state,” Hosemann said. “I’m hopeful that our open hand to the Justice Department, our research and our regulations will deter an action against my state.”

The Mississippi NAACP has not said yet whether it would challenge the state law in court, but it has not ruled out legal action.

“The Mississippi voter ID law is just as oppressive as Texas’ and North Carolina’s voter ID laws,” said Carroll Rhodes, general counsel for the Mississippi NAACP. “The same actions being taken by affected voters and the Justice Department in those states should be explored in Mississippi.”

Edward Hailes, general counsel with the Advancement Project, said the national group would work with the Mississippi NAACP and others if there’s a challenge to the state’s law.

“North Carolina is ground zero for us, but other states are responding to the Shelby County decision by promulgating new laws, so we’re going to have to look at all of them depending on the resources we have,” he said.

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Groups say Mississippi should take lesson from voting-law challenges | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Nothing eery about voter ID | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com

Nothing eery about voter ID | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com.

All of a sudden I saw it. It had reappeared on the internet, a defense of Mississippi’s photo ID law from a reader in Alabama. It was time to take another one down and perform an autopsy.

Inside the guts of “Nothing eery about voter ID”

Nothing eery about voter ID

Pathways of Privilege

Being white and male gives you legacy advantages that you probably don’t realize you have, even in the age of Obama. John Kerry is obviously eminently qualified to be Secretary of State. It is the pathway to those qualifications, even in liberal Massachusetts, which played a role in his nomination. I might add that those pathways to qualifications have also greatly restricted African-American access to contributions to represenstation in the South (and to a lessor degree nationally when you take into account U.S. senators from Illinois and Massachuessetts) since the Redemption of the 19th century. Part of the foundation for this observation was the things like the following:

“After sustaining criticism from Republican Senators including John McCain, R-Ariz., Lindsey Graham, R-Ga., and Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., Rice said in a letter to President Obama, “I am convinced now that the confirmation process would be lengthy, disruptive and costly– to you and our most pressing national interests and international priorities.”

Kerry, in contrast, began his confirmation process with a series of jokes to his colleagues. ”I don’t want this to affect your opening questions. But let me say I’ve never seen a more distinguished and better looking group of public officials in my life,” Kerry said to laughter. In a show of bipartisanship, McCain introduced “[his] friend Senator Kerry” along with introductions from Clinton and newly-elected Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren.” “““`MSNBC

The presence of Secretary of State Clinton and Senator Warren and many other women, along with President Obama is evidence that the pathways are multiplying and opening. This is evidence of the liberal evolution of the nation. But you’ll have to drag the South into this bold new world, because that Republican Southern Strategy intersected with anti-labor pro-corporate strategy that continues to assist in hurtling American labor on a downward trajectory in a fashion that has made certain that there has not been one black U.S. Senator or U.S. Representaive or Governor in places like Mississippi, Alabama, or Louisiana (places with substiantial black populations) since the Redemption. It is in this world that photo ID is used as a new access restriction device. Restrict the number and economic groups of people who participate in the democratic process and you can determine the gender and race of the representatives and the democratic content of the policies (including how widely prosperity is dispersed)that the government produces.